The struggles of being an international book blogger

Hello friends, happy Wednesday! How are you? I’m glad to write this now because I’m having a day off work today and boy, it feels GOOD ahah. Anyway, today I’m, as always, thrilled to be back with my Blogging Ways feature and a way to rant about everything blogging. I have had this blog post in mind for a couple of weeks now and I’m glad to actually sit down and talk about it all.

In case you didn’t know this, I’m French and living in France. I don’t know why, for people not knowing this, it always seems to surprise them. I’m not sure, I’m guessing I should take this as a compliment that my English isn’t so bad? Anyway, I’m not here to talk about how I eat baguettes (I do), but to talk about BOOKS and how, as the tiny French I am, I’m having the case of international book blogging struggles.

Before heading into this, disclaimer: I am writing this to zoom on the struggles I am having and trying to be honest. I’m not here to bash on people lucky enough to get physical ARCs, enjoy their local librairies and all. Just saying, you’re lucky.

The physical ARCs (Advance Reader Copies) problem

Let’s start this blog post with the most obvious – and controversial, really – topic of being an international book blogger, which is ARCs. In case you’re not familiar with this, ARCs are Advance Reader Copies, books bloggers are lucky enough to get before the book releases to read and review it. Being able to get physical ARCs at all is such a chance ; but when you’re an international blogger, it is basically impossible. Or at least, it is way, way harder. I have been blogging for over two and a half years now, I have built a pretty decent following and I have tried and requested physical ARCs more than once from publishers, but I actually never got one from big publishing houses. You know, just like you’re seeing all over on Twitter and everywhere.

I’m lucky enough to get e-ARCs once in a while, but sometimes the territory restrictions don’t allow me to be approved for some titles. Which, let’s be honest, kind of makes me sad. On the other hand, I’m just telling myself I am buying the books when they are released and even if I’m missing all of the pre-release hype people are always ranting on, I’m supporting the authors. Even if I’m waiting months after everyone has read the book to actually get to it.#foreverlatetothehype

The bookstore / library problem

I’m going to say something that will make most of you scream in despair. I have no bookshop or library – at least, none with the books I want to read. The only books they have in English are the classics, they have never heard of young adult books. If I want to read all of the books I love, I have no choice but to buy them online. In France, I’m lucky enough to get free shipping from Amazon, and BookDepository is also an amazing free-shipping option, but I know other bloggers don’t have that chance. BOOKS can get quite expensive veeeeeeeery quickly. I can’t browse in the bookshops and libraries for hours on end and get the physical book right away, I need to wait. Obviously, whenever I can fly away to an English-speaking country with bookshops, I stay in these places for hours on end reading all the books and my sister hates me.

The book events / conventions / author signings problem

As most of you probably know already, most of the bookish events and conventions are happening across the Atlantic for me, in the USA. Most of the authors are touring this very same country – and Canada as well sometimes, when their book is released. A lot of bookish events are also happening way way down there in Australia. There is an event that sounds quite amazing being held in the lovely and my favorite city in the world, London, in the summer, called YALC. Basically, everything is in English-speaking countries and I was born saying Bonjour and sometimes I’m not sure why because I speak English in my head and would dream of going to these events.

I can’t go to any of these things because of geography. I tried but apparently I am not able to teleport myself there. I don’t have enough days off and money to actually get on a plane and be able to go to these wonderful events I’m dreaming of. Someday, maybe. In the meantime, I’m living through all of you.

The time-difference problem

You know, that old song from Simple Plan going “You say good morning, when it’s midnight” ? Nevermind if you don’t know this song, you’ll get the gist here: this is a summary of my life as a book blogger, especially when it comes to the twitter community. On WordPress, no one cares or notices the time, really – or at least, I know I don’t. But whenever I want to try and get involved in the Twitter community, it is always hard to because most of the amazing Twitter Chats are happening when it is 1 a.m here and I need to sleep in order not to be a zombie to go to work the next morning, so I feel like I am missing out on a LOT of things because of time difference.

And geography, basically.

In other ways, I know I’m lucky, and geography has nothing to do with that. I’m lucky to spend my weekends writing blog posts and enjoying what I am doing, having this little place to fangirl about books and having people understand it. Being a book blogger, a YA book blogger, reading books mostly in English, and living in a non-English-speaking country has a LOT of struggles and more than once I have felt envy. It’s only human to, I guess. But I also guess that I can eat my baguettes and enjoy my delicious French food. Whenever I’ll get to travel again, I’ll spend a whole lot of time in bookshops and annoy people and it will all feel quite exceptional to have all of these books at hand, even if just for a moment.

If you’re an international blogger, are you feeling some of these struggles? How do you deal with it? Did you ever get a physical ARC? Do you have book budgets, since books are harder to get by?

If you’re not an international blogger (meaning: you’re not experimenting these struggles), did you know about all of these struggles? Would you enjoy your bookshops a bit more for us, please?

Feel free to share your thoughts in comments!

Posted by

Book blogger, travel blogger, writer. πŸ“š |🌍 | πŸ’ž Writing & Communications Graduate. French. Living on love, wanderlust and ya books.

137 thoughts on “The struggles of being an international book blogger

  1. You already know I struggled with all these ‘problems’ myself. “I tried but apparently I am not able to teleport myself there. I don’t have enough days off and money to actually get on a plane and be able to go to these wonderful events I’m dreaming of.” This. This so much.
    Also, yes, it sucks that we don’t have amazing bookshops or libraries with the latest English novels. Online shopping has definitely been a saving grace for me reading and blogging life…not so much for my wallet though πŸ˜€
    Great post as always, Marie!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Haha same here. I am so thankful to be able to order books online, otherwise I don’t know how I would survive haha πŸ˜›
      Thank you so, so much Lauren, I’m glad you can relate to this ❀ ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m not a book blogger but I can totally relate to this post. Especially on the bookstore and library problem. It’s even worse in Japan (I’m a Malaysian living here) because it’s almost impossible to find English books and to make it worse I live in the countryside. So English books are pretty rare and the only option I have is online shopping (Amazon, Book Depositary). Luckily, I own a Kindle lol.

    Nurul Rasya | Blog

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Haha oh, Kindles and ebooks are life-savers, aren’t they! I’m glad – but also a bit sad – that you can relate to my struggles. I’m really thankful we have online shopping to save us, allowing us to get all the books one way or another πŸ™‚
      Thank you so much for your sweet comment! ❀

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  3. I totally understand your struggles! Mine isn’t solely a book review blog, but I do read a lot and am trying to begin a writing career. All of the writing conferences and face-to-face networking take place across an ocean. I am an English speaking US citizen who lives in China.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh I didn’t know so many writing events happened in the US as well – it’s so bad you can’t get there either :/ I’m guessing we all have our struggles where we live, but…we should remember our perks as well πŸ™‚
      Thank you so much for your comment, Lonna, and best of luck for your writing career! πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, you are right that we should remember our perks as well. I love living overseas and wouldn’t change the lifestyle I’ve chosen. No matter where we live, there will always be good and bad together.

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    1. Haha well, I guess I have other perks of living where I live (hint: food. I love food). As long as I can get my books online or somewhere, I’ll be okay πŸ™‚ Thank you for your comment ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I’m an English speaker who reads, writes and blogs in English but lives in the Netherlands. Thankfully, the Dutch are multilingual. All bookstores have books in English and not just the classics! There are even several English-only bookstores! But I feel your struggles having lived in Germany and Turkey where English books are either strictly classics for schoolchildren or non-existent. As a writer who markets mostly to Americans, I struggle. I can’t afford to send physical ARCs and book signing? Yeah, not going to happen.

    I feel your struggles!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ohhh this is SO awesome – you make me want to move to The Netherlands right away ahah, that sounds like the dream ❀
      Thank you so, so much for your comment, I'm glad you could relate to this πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I relate so much! Fortunately, here in the Netherlands English books are much easier to get to and we do have libraries and bookstores with YA books. I have just requested a few ARCs and one of the publishers actually sent it to me and I AM OVER THE MOON! It was not from a major publisher but still! So maybe I am lucky 😊 but the problem of time zones and not being able to go to bookish gatherings and events is a struggle for me as well.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I SO want to live in the Netherlands right now, it sounds so great! And congratulations on the ARCs, that’s fantastic, you are so lucky! This gives me some hope too ahah πŸ™‚
      We should start up our own bookish events, gather all European fellows and everything πŸ™‚
      Thank you so much Lia ❀ ❀

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank youu! And yes we should have our own bookish events! And then with international books and not just the ones published in our countries (I don’t particularly like Dutch YA books). We deserve the chance to meet US/UK writers too!
        You’re welcome!

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  6. Being in Canada is hard enough – I can’t imagine how much harder it is in France! Book prices in the states are so cheap! Here, for some hardcovers, it’s 30-40$. And you’re right, signings rarely ever come around unless I want to travel 4+ hours. Book conventions – forget it! Sorry being a book lover is so hard for you! That just makes you an even more dedicated reader πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. WHAT?! Jeez that seems so expensive! Frnech editions of books in hardcovers are quite expensive as well, this is so annoying…and the reason why I buy everything online and wait for the paperbacks.
      Aha yes, I guess it makes me even more dedicated, you’re right πŸ™‚ Thank you so much for your sweet comment ❀ ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Ugh, yes!! I’m still based in North America, but not in the US, so a lot of these struggles still apply. It’s quite annoying to come across exciting giveaways on blogs, only to be unable to enter them because I don’t live in the US! Not to mention all those great book conventions and writers conferences – they’re so far away, and the US dollar is just way too strong for my to justify a trip down. AND books are often published here way later than in the US, so I have to wait forever to get my hands on all the fantastic books I’ve been reading reviews of on all my favourite blogs. πŸ˜₯

    But I do get state-funded medical care, so there’s that. πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 1 person

    1. OH yes, there are so many great giveaways – and I understand how the shipping fees might be too expensive for people to actually extend the giveaways internationally, but….all the books ahah.
      I have to wait forever as well to get the books, it is so annoying at times, always reading the books after everyone’s done with them and moving on ahah πŸ™‚
      There are positive things though for sure about the places we live, and we are dedicated readers and bloggers πŸ™‚

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  8. I feel you! I’m living in France as well but I’m actually from the Philippines. I was so dismayed the first time I went into a bookstore and there’s no English book in sight. Libraries don’t offer much either. I haven’t tried requesting physical ARCs yet as I know it will be nearly impossible. For now, I’ll have to be content with digital ARCs.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ohh you’re living in France as well? That’s so great! πŸ˜€ ❀
      It is really sad that there aren't many English books in bookshops. Some have small English sections but well…they are small unfortunately. I'm glad we can order online ahah πŸ™‚
      Thank you so much for your comment! ❀ ❀

      Liked by 1 person

      1. So true. My husband and I have to go to the city just so I can buy books. But it always makes me happy seeing a lot of books even if it’s in French. Just goes to show how you guys love to read. Even the library I go to have a huge collection. πŸ™‚

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  9. My friend Sammi at onebookishgirl (WordPress) is an AUS blogger and she has finally gotten in touch with the AUS pubs and imprints: she gets titles and is on some blogger lists for pubs now! I’m very impressed that she started getting ARCs: one of the biggest probs is that one company will publish in the US , but a diff imprint might publish the same book in AUS. I don’t know if they do that in your country but I thought mentioning it wouldn’t hurt!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s so great for her! πŸ˜€ Thank you for the tip, but it won’t work, since all the books here are published in, well, French, ahah, so it’s not the same – there isn’t an English publishing company here that releases the books in English whom I can ask to, unfortunately. Oh well, I have the e-ARCs sometimes when I’m lucky enough πŸ˜€
      Thank you, Stephanie! ❀ ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I thought I had it bad living in England as a book blogger because most events happen in the US and books are usually released there earlier as well, but honestly reading your post I realise how lucky I actually am as a book blogger! The only thing I can relate to is time zones because UK and France time is only an hour different so I also find that everything happens at midnight. Is YA often translated into French?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. BUT I LOVE England, you ARE lucky to live in England it’s such a beautiful country πŸ™‚ ❀ Also it's so great, you get some books released earlier than in the US and everything, from cool English writers πŸ˜€
      Yes, all the popular YA books are usually translated into French, but it takes a little while and…I really love reading them in English. Also, more than often, I don't know why, the French titles end up being ridiculous hahaha πŸ˜›
      Thank you so much for your sweet comment! ❀

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Haha you’re welcome 😊 I do love England a lot, and France is so beautiful too! Yeah I did forget to mention all the wonderful English YA authors, it’s just a shame that a lot of them don’t get as much hype as US authors.

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      2. I agree with you – there are so many incredible English YA authors, yet I feel like they’re not really well-known, that’s a shame! They deserve all the love for sure.

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  11. As a German blogger I can definitely relate to most of the point you made above – minus the time zones thing. My sleeping is so messed up at the moment that I’m usually awake for the Twitter chats. I’ll just sometimes forget they are happening!

    I recently signed up for a blogger program Random House Germany is offering and was able to request ARCs that way though unfortunately none of them were recent English releases that I would’ve loved to read but rather books I hadn’t heard about before! Have you checked if the big publishing houses offer similar programs in France?

    Also, you guys’ have RIDICULOUSLY expensive books over there! I just recently talked to a friend over there about books and prices and it’s such a difference! I mean, brand new hardcovers are pretty expensive here too (Lord Of Shadows came in at 23€ when it was first released) but at least paperbacks are usually on the cheaper side and luckily if it’s a well-known author they’ll release paperbacks pretty quickly after the initial release.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ahah oh really? I’m sorry you’ve been having a bit of a messed-up sleeping schedule :/ I’m with you on forgetting, though. The little ones actually happening in my time zone are so off my radar when they are happening, I’m mad at myself afterwards haha.
      Ohhh this is so great, I had no idea about that program! Thank you for mentioning it, I need to see if such a thing exists here as well πŸ™‚
      RIGHT?! Books are so overpriced at times, that’s why I’d rather order online….but sometimes some books are still expensive and only on hardcovers so I have to wait even longer just to order them ahah. Life of a bookworm…it’s not easy (but worth it!) πŸ˜€
      Than you so much for your comment! ❀ ❀

      Like

  12. I don’t know if thriftbooks works for you, but I am a huge fan of this website, because they sell used books for a very reasonable price. I can get 3-4 books for about $15 and free shipping! I don’t know if they will send it to your country, but if they do, then I totally recommend it in order to save money xxx

    Melina | http://www.ivefoundwaldo.com

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I totally understand your struggles Marie, maybe in a slightly different way but it still counts right? πŸ™‚ My local library doesn’t have any books I can read either, I mean they’re all in English because I live in England but they’re all a good five years old now. I seriously can’t think of the last time my library actually updated their catalogue but every time I go there I always see the same books on the shelves.
    I feel like we all struggle with time zones as well, in our own ways maybe, I’m not on Twitter but I definitely get where you’re coming from there. πŸ™‚
    Hopefully there are things that make being an international book blogger worth it, or just things that make being a book blogger worth it for you in the end though. πŸ˜€ ❀
    Great post as well. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh no, that’s annoying! Maybe they’ll get the hint and update their catalog soon, I certainly hope so. You always have the fabulous Waterstone’s, right? πŸ˜€
      Yes, definitely. In the end, if I’m struggling with these little things, I still am over the moon to be able to blog and love it that much, so yes it’s definitely worth it ❀
      Thanky ou so much, Beth! ❀ ❀

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I hope so, I can’t imagine there are too many people that visit the library to check out the same books over and over again. Yep, Waterstones makes up for it all! πŸ˜€
        That’s great to hear, there’s always something to make blogging worthwhile even if there are things that make it not worthwhile you know?
        That’s all right! πŸ™‚ ❀

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Ah Marie as you know I go through all of these (except for the time difference thing yikes) but yeah 😦 Sucks. And it’s true! In some countries the YA genre is unheard of. In Ecuador we do have a section for YA books but what saddens me is that we don’t PRODUCE YA books. No one here writes YA. Except for Zoraida Cordova, but then she doesn’t really count because she grew up in the US and the culture is different, but I still love her because it’s a bit of ecuadorian in the YA community and that’s amazing.

    How do I deal with the bookshop problem… I’m a bit lucky in the sense that we have one bookshop that brings YA titles both in spanish and some in english. I don’t read in spanish anymore which is a damn shame because a new independent bookstore that brings books from Mexico just opened in the city and is bringing more updated releases and I’m like WHYYYYY. But anywayyy, I get a few books, two or three per year from local bookstore and my mom sends me two or three books once or twice a year whenever she can send me a package from the US. And then there’s also my little trips to visit my mom, in 2015 and then this past march, in which I bought about 30 books between the two trips. HAD TO TAKE ADVANTAGE!

    Sadly, Amazon doesn’t ship to Ecuador without a huge hassle, and TBD doesn’t either 😦 But we manage, right? Every time I feel down about not being able to participate in the community as the others do, I remind myself that I still have books and to make the best out of the situation by rereading or reading romance ebooks!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. OH same here – well I don’t really read tons of French authors so I can’t really say, but it seems to me like YA is really a centered market in the US and a little bit in the UK, it is sad.
      It’s so great that you have a good bookstore, and that your mom can send you a couple of books! At least you have some advantages for sure – everything is good to take!
      It makes me so sad and upset for you that you can’t order on amazon or TBD! I’m happy to hear you still manage to spread the love, and I guess all of the hassle just means we are crazy-dedicated to books πŸ˜€
      Thank you so, so much for sharing your thoughts about this, Pam! ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  15. I can totally relate to this post! Yeah, I can understand with shipping costs issues with physical books but why do they have to put territory restrictions on ebooks. It’s totally ridiculous! I mean blogs are a global platform medium for book marketing and everything bookish. All the best books in netgalley are territory restricted and it’s totally not fair for international bloggers like us.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree with you and have to admit, I don’t understand the restriction either when it comes to e-books?! They are virtual and there is no hassle with shipping costs and everything so I don’t really get why it wouldn’t be available for us as well. It makes me a bit sad :/
      Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts with me, Raven ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Wow! I am fortunate enough to live in the United States, be ten minutes from my library, and twenty minutes from a small indie bookseller.

    I did know that Book Depository and Amazon ship internationally, and realize that the distance would be a struggle, but I didn’t know anything about the libraries or the bookstores. It makes sense, but my brain didn’t bridge the gaps.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh wow, you’re so lucky! I’d be you, I would spend every single day going to the library ahah ❀
      Oh I get it – in the end, I think it's easy to forget when we're all surrounded by books πŸ™‚ But well, we manage by getting the books other ways, buying them online and everything πŸ˜€
      Thank you s omuch for your comment, Lauren ❀

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  17. OH MY GOD MARIE. YES. YOU ARE SPEAKING MY MIND.

    I had an idea for a post like this as well (I literally thought of the exact same title hahaha) but I was going to focus it more on ARCS! Because #thestruggleisreal when it comes being an international book blogger and wanting to receive ARCs. I always get sooo jealous when I see people receiving all these wonderful new releases MONTHS in advance and I’m sat here in good ol’ Germany like….. okay *sobs*

    AND THE CONVENTIONS THING. YES. WITH THE WHOLE BOOK EXPO/BOOK CON THINGY A FEW WEEKS AGO I’VE TRULY REALISED HOW MUCH IT SUCKS NOT TO BE LIVING IN THE US (OR UK). I’m glad we’re both in the same boat though, it makes me feel a little less sad and alone πŸ˜€ ❀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Haha oh, great minds think alike, right? πŸ˜€ Yes, I can’t help but feel a little jealous whenever I see all of these gorgeous ARCs around and wonder if I’ll ever get so lucky. I still am pretty lucky to scream about the books I love all day, but the ARCs…well it seems special ahah πŸ™‚
      Haha yes you are NOT ALONE in this, we can struggle together now for sure πŸ˜› ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  18. I feel you so much on this one! I’m from Denmark and though I can’t relate on the ARC thing I’m so over my local library as well. I read most of my books in English, most of which I’ve bought myself because the library didn’t have them…
    The selection of international books at the stores are pretty limited as well 😦 However something amazing did happen once! There was actually a signing at my favorite bookstore, so I went there and got my copy of Divergent signed by Veronica Roth. That was really awesome (and terrifying) πŸ˜€

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ohhh Denmark, really? I would LOVE to visit someday, the country seems so beautiful ❀
      WOW! Well, even if there aren't big English sections, you had that lucky moment – and maybe it'll mean more authors will come to your country?! πŸ˜€ Let's hope so! πŸ˜€
      Thank you so much for your comment! ❀

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  19. I live in the US, so I don’t face the same struggles as you haha! And WHAAAAT. No English YA books in bookstores/libraries near you? I’m sorry. πŸ˜₯ But I do feel out of the loop with time zones because I have lots of friends (including you!) who live internationally and I can’t talk to them as often! But hey, you get baguettes. I love me some baguettes. XD

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    1. Not even one tiny little bookstore or library haha. That sucks but I’m glad online bookshops exist to save me πŸ˜›
      Haha, we should trade for a while, I give you fabulous baguettes and French food and you give me a bit of your bookstores privileges πŸ˜›
      Thank you, May! πŸ˜€

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  20. I feel so lucky that I’m a book lover in the US!

    There are a couple publishers that do international giveaways for ARCs but they do them so infrequently. I’m a new blogger so the only reason I’ve been able to get ARCs is through giveaways or festivals. I’ve heard for some people in other countries that it’s actually easier for them to get physical ARCs but I guess it really depends on what country you live in and how the publisher handles ARCs!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yeah, I guess it all depends on the countries. I don’t live in an English speaking country and I read books in English so I guess this makes things even harder ahah. But I regret nothing, ARCs or not, I love it so…I guess it’s okay πŸ™‚
      Thank you so much for your comment! ❀

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m glad — but also sad obviously – that you get the same struggles :/ At least we are still trying to talk about the books we love and get them and love them even if it’s a bit harder, so…we are warriors πŸ˜›
      Thank you so much for your comment, Nina! ❀

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  21. Hi Marie! Or Bonjour! I had no idea you were blogging from France. Your English s fabulous! My French, not so much. I’m very impressed! I am sorry about your lack of English speaking books. I wish there was something I could do to help! I too like YA books, but it’s really expensive to mail to France. Does anyone have any book sharing ideas? I know my family ships books to each other, maybe a group of friendly bloggers could ship to each other? Just a thought.

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    1. Bonjour! Aww thank you so, so much, that means a lot to me ❀ I'm always scared to me silly mistakes while writing, I'm glad that doesn't come up or show, if I do ahah πŸ™‚
      Oh this is such an incredible idea, it would be pretty amazing to have a big book exchange. However, I don't know how that would work and if that could, since shipping can be so expensive at times…. Well, it's something I will think about for sure! Thank you SO much for the idea ❀

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  22. Despite living in Canada, getting physical ARCs can be a bit of a pain for me. Maybe I just don’t have the stats on paper to do it, but I rarely get physical ARCs–or if I’m offered, I feel bad because shipping can get pricey! On the other hand, anytime I browse Netgalley, I always seem to be into the titles that aren’t available in my region πŸ˜›

    My local library was really tiny growing up so I made sure when I moved to a larger city for university, I took full advantage of getting a library card. Books are so expensive! (eBooks are getting pricier too!) And I was running out of book space. Thankfully, eBooks are really catching on at my local library (they share with a bunch of libraries so we get more books) so I definitely have more titles at my disposal than before.

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    1. Ahah right, happens to me all the time on NetGalley as well, the titles aren’t available for me and I want to cry haha.
      RIGHT? E-books are SO pricey at times, it’s crazy because it is a digital book and sometimes it’s even more expensive or the same price as the actual physical copy…I don’t know why that happens. It makes me mad :/
      I’m glad to hear you have more books at your disposal now though, that’s awesome πŸ˜€
      Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts, Lauren! ❀ ❀

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  23. I’m international too and I experience all these things too! I’m from Belgium actually πŸ˜ƒ The only thing I don’t have is the bookstore problem. I’m lucky enough that one of the local bookstores (I live in a city, so there are several. Again, lucky) has English books. Still it’s a struggle with my local library.

    I’ve never gotten an ARC, but I don’t think my blog is big enough yet.

    And it sucks not being able to go to bookish events.πŸ˜”

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    1. Ohhh Belgium, hi, neighbor! πŸ˜€ ❀
      It's so great that you have a bookstore with great English books, that's the dream for sure πŸ˜€ ❀
      Oh, the bookish events…and the ARCs. I want to believe someday we'll get both, let's not lose hope πŸ˜€ ❀
      Thank you so much for your comment, Eva!

      Like

      1. Hi neigbour!πŸ˜‰ It’s indeed amazing that those bookstores have English books! The biggest one in town has books in Dutch, French and English and that’s were I get my books.
        Let’s not lose hope indeed!
        You’re welcome πŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

  24. I hear you on all of those!!! My cousin recently found a library that lets you borrow YA ebooks and I was just like “WHAT IS THIS MAGIC PLACE YOU SPEAK OF!?”, but libraries aren’t free in Austria. To borrow anything you have to get a a membership or library card for a fee.
    And speaking of events!!! I looked everywhere but Vancouver is a wasteland for book signings. I really want to go back to Toronto. They have all the fun stuff happening.
    Also, I just want to say that I think it’s dumb when you can’t request something on NetGalley because of country restrictions. I mean, seriously?! As long as I blog in English and the readership comes from English speaking countries, who gives a fuck? People rarely know I am from Austria either, so it just doesn’t make any sense to me. Then again, lots about NetGalley doesn’t make sense sometimes.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. OH REALLY? THAT’S SO COOL.
      I get the struggle, libraries aren’t free in France either, there is a membership fee, it’s not too expensive but you have to pay it every year.
      OH really, that sucks :/ Well….too bad Toronto is so far away from Vancouver, you can’t really go there just for a day when there is a cool signing :/
      I so agree with you here – right? I don’t get why it matters if we aren’t based in the USA – as long as we have the readership. NetGalley is so obscure sometimes ahah. Thank you, Kat ❀

      Liked by 1 person

      1. She has free membership because of uni at that library. She’s one lucky girl hahaha
        Yeah, Toronto is like a 5 hour flight or 3+ days by train, so I can’t just go for fun. BUT Toronto doesn’t have as much filming, so there’s always that.

        Liked by 1 person

  25. Your English is amazing! Great topic as always, how do you think of all these every week?! Send me your blogging brain vibes please. Although I live in the UK I definitely share some of the struggles with you as I live in a small town so we have a library but they don’t have a big selection. I feel super lucky that they do have a YA section though so sometimes it can be very good. Although for some reason they have series sometimes without having the first book, and it’s not a case that someone is borrowing it. It’s that they bought like the 3rd or 4th book in. Usually it’s old series they have too πŸ™‚ So jealous of the American libraries which have new releases!
    I also share the signings and events struggle like I mentioned I live in a small town so they don’t happen near me. I could get 2 trains in order to get into London so a 4 hour journey but that would cost quite a lot and it’s just not an outgoing I can’t afford.
    I watch all the American Booktubers with such envy!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. just read that back and realised I have typed ‘it’s just not an outgoing I can’t afford’ – it’s meant to say can afford. I definitely cannot afford dropping that sort of money haha! Oopsy my bad sorry πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Aww thank you so much, Hannah, that’s so sweeet of you to say ❀
      It's so great you have a YA section – I dream of that ahah πŸ™‚ I would love to have all of the new releases close-by as well, it has to be SO COOL to be able to get them so quickly!
      OH I get it – so many fun signings and events are happening in London (like YALC this summer, I so want to go there) – I hope someday you'll be able to go to one and experience all the fun! ❀
      Thank you so, so much for sharing your thoughts with me, Hannah ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  26. That’s sad about the library situation. I’ve heard that some libraries only let you check two things out or are just too small. There’s library in my home state where the lady whose the librarian works by herself all day with no help. She doesn’t have a degree either; someone needed to be there and so she volunteers despite no help. As are as the ARC stuff, I don’t think it’s a big deal. I haven’t been very lucky in that for a while. I hope things get better for you for being able to get books easier. I don’t get a ton of book events either sadly…there all hundreds of miles away. One day hopefully. But I really enjoyed reading this; I feel more educated knowing how things are in another part of the world πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Definitely. I do hope that publishers and other places do more international giveaways to give more chances πŸ™‚ but I do love that Book Depository is free shipping and goes pretty much anywhere. I think their prices actually beat Amazon sometimes

        Liked by 1 person

  27. I’m a Canadian book blogger and I can certainly relate to many of these struggles you listed. I have been fortunate to be contacted by a couple of publishing houses, although I was a bad blogger who didn’t follow through with the review — they were cookbooks with expensive ingredients, so sue me… one day I’ll write about them. But I was recently chosen by HarperCollins to receive a book titled ‘Local Girl Missing’, which I will review quickly. A small handful of books I have collected but otherwise I’m a major supporter of my public library – yes, I do miss the hype, but what can ya do?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh I’m glad – well obviously sad as well – that you experiment the same struggles. It’s so good that you have been contacted by publishers, and HarperCollins to review a book, that’s awesome! I hope you enjoyed that book, Local Girl Missing? πŸ™‚
      Yes sometimes I guess we miss the hype but well…we do our best after all πŸ™‚
      Thank you so much for your comment ❀

      Like

  28. Your English is amazing- seriously!! Ahhh that would be terrible- don’t worry- it’s not controversial and I always feel super lucky about the library thing- I just wish there were libraries full of all different books all around the world to solve this problem!!

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Thank you so much for sharing this enlightening post, Marie!

    I must confess that I take being an American book blogger for granted a lot. I’m so grateful that I have bookstores and libraries nearby where I live (although I never take advantage of the latter). And the ARCs are always such a privilege, too.

    But I can definitely sort of relate with the bookish events being so far away from me. Then again, it’s not overseas like you, of course. But I still can’t attend 90% of the time since bigger events are usually in NY, LA, or some other big city that I need airplane tickets in order to get to. (Unless I want to take long road trips.) Luckily though, Yallfest happens to be in my state, however. Although it is a smaller event. But I guess it’s better than nothing, haha.

    Anyway, wonderful post! (Also, you’re free to visit me sometime and we can go book shopping and/or attend Yallfest together!)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I saw you talking about Yallfest, I think you wrote a blog post about it all? I LOVED reading it and it sounds like such a fun event. Sometimes, even if the event is small, it can be even better because less crowds and everything πŸ™‚ I’ll DEFINITELY take you up on that offer, Summer, I would love that so much ❀ ❀
      Thank you! ❀ ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  30. ‘I was born saying bonjour’ I can’t help but picture a tiny baby Marie saying bonjour now hahaha ALL OF THESE THOUGH. I RELATE. A LOT. I am lucky to live in Amsterdam so I have two English book stores close to me, but their young adult section is nothing compared to the ones in America and the UK haha (I laugh but really I want to cry when I remember how many YA books they sell in other countries πŸ˜‚) A lot of books are never at the bookstores though so I end up ordering a lot too. Don’t even get me started on libraries though I’m so jealous of people living in English-speaking countries haha

    Liked by 1 person

    1. HAHAHAHA, oh how funny was I when I was little hahaha.
      It is SO cool that you have two bookstores in Amsterdam like that – I need to go back there as soon as I can to visit these! ❀ It is CRAZY though, yes, how massive the YA sections are in the UK and in the US, I am forever jealous as well ahah πŸ™‚
      Thank you, Michelle! ❀ ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  31. I’m also an international blogger (I live in Austria at the moment) and I can relate to all of these sooo much!
    I have never gotten a physical ARC. In the beginning I was jealous of people who got them, but with time I realised that it would bother me to have unfinished copies of books on my shelves. So I don’t really mind not getting them, I’m happy to get ARCs from NetGalley and just read them on my Kindle. πŸ™‚
    I also can’t get books in bookstores or libraries and have to order them online most of the time. Actually the bookstores here in Vienna do have some YA books and other genres that interest me, but it’s a very limited selection. I used to love reading from the library (when I was younger and reading in my native language), but now I can’t find books that I’m interested in in the library and have to buy them for myself.
    I have never been to a bookish event before. As you said, all of them are in English speaking countries and I just don’t have the means to get there and go to those events. (After all traveling isn’t cheap!) That’s the saddest part for me I think, simply because I would love to meet some of my favourite authors and just attend those events. But hopefully I will be able to do that in the future.
    Amazing post! πŸ˜€ (And sorry, I ended up rambling a lot here!)

    Like

    1. Oh I understand – finished copies are for sure beautiful, and it feels good to tell ourselves that we are helping the authors by buying their books πŸ™‚ I can’t help but feel a little envy at people reading so many books earlier ahah, I’m really impatient at times πŸ˜›
      Oh yes, same here. Traveling is quite expensive, and I’d dream of meeting my favorite authors someday and go to these amazing events. Let’s hope we will do that someday! πŸ˜€
      Thank you so, so much for your sweet comment, and never apologize for rambling, I LOVE it ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  32. I’m lucky enough to receive some ARCs, but whenever I see something sometimes that’s like US only my heart breaks a little haha πŸ’” I totally feel you on the bookstores and time differences. Like I live in a small town and we only have 1 bookstore here and they are ridiculously expensive. Being Australian, I always end up logging onto Twitter in the middle of everything and am left sitting there like “WAIT, WHAT’S GOING ON???” and am desperately trying to catch up haha.

    Like

    1. Haha, same here. I have a bit of ARC envy, really, but I’m working on it. There are many privileges to being a bookworm living in an English speaking country, but I guess there are perks of living where I live as well πŸ™‚
      Hahaha oh yes, same about the Twitter thing. With the time difference, I never get what is happening and miss all of the dramas and such. It’s not a bad thing, though, when you think about it… πŸ˜›
      Thank you so much, Lauren! ❀

      Like

  33. Wow! I’m not sure what I would do without libraries… or rather a library with books I want to read! Wow… I’m a little in shock! Did you read Jackie’s post about the used book service? She is in Germany and not sure you can use it in France but… worth a shot? I feel you about physical ARCs especially since you have to budget for every book you read! We in America are spoiled! The time zone issue I hadn’t thought of… we need more twitter things on the weekends! What a lovely post… I feel some of your pain now, though I know you are such a positive good hearted person that you just deal with it β€οΈπŸ¦‹πŸŒˆ

    Like

    1. I did read Jackie’s post and I need to look that up for sure! πŸ™‚ Ahah yes, I guess you’re lucky, please enjoy the bookshops and libraries for me :P. I’m trying to make the most of it and know I, at least, have internet to order books online and everything, so I’m trying to stay positive. It feels good to rant about it sometimes though πŸ™‚ Thank you so, so much, Dani, you’re way too sweet ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  34. I’ve never related more to a post before! There’s only a few libraries in Lebanon that sell YA books, but I’ve read them all. They only have the really famous books like Harry Potter, The Hunger Games, and Divergent so every single time I go there I end up ordering many books which take around 3 months to get here. One of my brothers is studying in the US and I can’t wait till I’m able to visit him there. I’ve already planned that when I finish high school in two years, I’m going to live with him for a month and go to all conventions happening at that time and I can’t wait! Also, I talk English in my head and to close friends/family too but that’s because I’m English educated.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh wow, 3 months, that’s a long time to wait for books. I don’t know how you do it, you are my hero, Tatiana, ahah.
      Ohhh this is so awesome, you’re going to have the BEST time there, I’m sure! πŸ˜€ ❀
      Thank you so, so much for your comment ❀

      Like

  35. Relaaaaatableeeeee ! Such an awesome post twinnie !! I’ve told you I tried requesting arcs before but living in Morocco is even worse than France so no luck so far, I was thinking about giving up but after taking to a friend I might give it another chance very soon and see what might come of it.
    Libraries and bookstores are the biggest of my struggles and what I’m most bittet about to be honest because I want to have a bookshelf overflowing with physical copies but I can’t because there’s nowhere to get them or they are super expensive and let’s not talk about shipping hahaha. So I’d rather get ebook because I can get more for the same amount of money.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Aww thank you so, so much my twinnie ❀ ❀ I hope your ARC quest will be successful – and if it is, TIPS and everything ahaha πŸ™‚
      Oh I get it – I feel lucky enough that shipping isn't that expensive or sometimes free, so I can have bookshelves but I'm definitely grateful for e-books as well. They are so much less expensive and even if I miss the feeling of holding an actual book, they're pretty practical as well πŸ™‚ ❀

      Like

  36. THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU for this post, Marie! As a fellow international blogger, I get a lot of these struggles. Like all these American bloggers I know get signed books and meet authors and go to BEA or whatever… there isn’t anything like that in India. Nor can I really get review copies of books I actually want to read. We haven’t got Net Galley yet although I guess that is an option… I don’t have twitter so the time difference thing isn’t so big. Also, I guess I’m lucky because I went to an international school and that had an okay library and then I can also get ebooks from a library in New Zealand. Anyway, thank you so so much for this post because I feel like a lot of bloggers don’t realise how lucky they are ❀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. OH thank YOU, Shar, for your sweet comment, I am so glad you could relate to this post. Some bloggers definitely are luckier, I guess we all are dedicated and, because of all of the struggles we encounter, some of us are even more, which I admire so much. I don’t think some bloggers know their luck, or at least, just take it for granted, or that’smy feeling at times.

      Like

  37. of course, the endless struggles of an international book blogger, hahaha.
    i think i do have a few more positives and a few more negatives than the ones you mentioned. for example, because the YA book community is growing fast on my country, book events are also becoming more popular. last weekend, i had the chance to go to a book event in my city and meet benjamin alire saenz and alwyn hamilton, which was fantastic! i also know that victoria schwab is coming to brazil in a few months, for another book event, so i’m definitely lucky on that side.
    however, reading books in english is hard in my country, because they’re soooo expensive. i know a few people that do buy english copies so they don’t have to wait for it to be translated, but i rather wait, since i can get it for a lot cheaper. of course, there are also some books that don’t ever get translated, so we stay in the endless feeling of *we’re missing out* because there’s really, no other option but spend way too much money in a copy that might take one month to get here.
    so, yes, struggles are real, hahah. fantastic post!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ohh this is so awesome! I’m so glad you’re getting more book events – and you got to meet authors already, that’s SO COOL! πŸ˜€
      I get it – English books aren’t cheap in my country either so I’d rather order online, there is more to chose from there as well πŸ™‚
      Thank you so, so much, Lais! ❀ ❀

      Like

  38. This is really interesting! I never would have thought about things like time-zone being a problem. It would be really hard to not have access to English books in libraries and bookstores. I went to a bookstore in Paris and it was a really nice store, but the YA section was teeny! I’m becoming more and more aware of how lucky I am to have libraries nearby…

    Anyway, fantastic post!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh thank you so, so much Lenna, I’m really happy you enjoyed reading this post and getting to know a bit more about how it is for international bloggers πŸ™‚ It’s quite hard not to have bookstores or libraries with the books I want, but I’m glad to be able to order online ahah πŸ™‚ Thank you! ❀

      Like

  39. I clicked on your blog firstly because of the title – it is catchy but it made me think of books read in front of the fire. I clicked ‘follow’ almost immediately because I was so impressed with the look of your site. Even though I know I shouldn’t judge a book by its cover! Also I know a few YA readers and struggle to know what books to get them for their birthdays etc & I suspect some I have chosen are not actually read. Your blog is informative, helpful for people interested in improving their blogging skills too. (Like me.)

    I know what you mean about the international date line – it is a disability on social media. And, gosh, I’m going on a bit, but quite often as a reader I trust the reviews that come after the hype reviews. A great blog, at least to me, is one I can read in front of my fire on a rainy day.

    Liked by 1 person

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