My story with ARCs as an international book blogger

This blog post has been boiling around in my mind for months and months, but I actually never really got the guts to write it all down. As I start writing this, I have no idea if I’ll end up hitting publish by the end of it all, to be completely honest. But I’ve been wanting, somehow, to share my story, so here I am.

ARCs are somehow controversial, at times, in the book community. They are also very, very complicated. ARCs, just in case you don’t know, are Advance Review Copies, sent over by publishers to book bloggers, librarians and other bookish people, for early reading, reviewing. Basically, it’s our job to hype these books up as much as we can in order to help the book and the publisher and just, spread more love towards the book overall.

I did not know ARCs existed until a couple months into blogging. I first found out about it and, the little 21 years-old that I was at that time (okay, I feel old now. Why the heck am I writing this) was astonished that people were able to get BOOKS before their release date and read it and review them and that was it. I mean, when you think about it, it is pretty incredible, isn’t it?

I first found my way into the ARCs world through NetGalley, back when as an international book blogger in 2014, you still could have a request button on 99,9% of the books and might get lucky.

Resources about getting physical ARCs, as a blogger and as an international book bloggers are endless and therefore, I decided to try my luck there, too. Holding a real copy of one of my favorite authors’ books before its release date, being able to be part of the hype for it all, being in touch with big publishers. It all seemed like a dream.

I wanted in, too.

It was a deep want to feel part of the community in that way, too, to be able to get books like others did. What did I that was so wrong? Wasn’t my blog pretty enough? Didn’t I manage to gather around enough followers? The voice in my anxiety-filled mind told me it would never, ever be enough. The voice in my heart told me that I just plain sucked, anyway.

The voice in my head told me that I was not an US-based book blogger and that therefore, my story with ARCs would be way more complicated than this.

It’s that latter voice that was right, obviously. I remember sending my first emails on a late April day, trying to request my most anticipated books of the entire year. Writing down everything properly, checking a trillion times for spelling mistakes. Trying to be eager without fangirling too much. Sharing my numbers, seeming small, but apparently seeming okay according to other book bloggers’ posts. Hitting send and praying.

Waiting a day. A week. A month. Three months. Six months. The book I wanted being released and, a year later, losing all hope of everything.

I maybe sent 3 or 4 emails around that time that April, my heart hopeful to be part of something big. Then, I gave up on it completely.

I kept on blogging my heart out, throwing my love into everything I did, meeting some of my now closest friends, reading, reading, reading, adding to the endless TBR. And, yes, I will admit it, looking sometimes with awe and envy at other bloggers getting books early, especially the books I would scream about until my throat parches and my heart hurts. I didn’t send any more emails. I used NetGalley, prayed and got lucky and I just thought geography sucked and if I couldn’t have my books, I’ll just keep my French baguette and wait until release day.

It was okay. It was just books. I still felt like I was missing something, some crucial part of the book blogger experience. But it was okay, really. I ordered the books I wanted when I could and I read and blogged.

I found out about Edelweiss and tried it out, eyes basically rolling out of their sockets when I noticed the incredible books available on that website. I filled out everything, I tried requesting there. I hoped, without ever any luck.

Two years later (yeah, you’ve read that right…), I sent an email about an early copy of a book. I had absolutely no hopes. I don’t even know what triggered that email sending years later. I just, did. Hope crawled its way back into my skin, into my bones, making me anxiously check out my emails every two hours, waiting for an answer. My email, sent in July, 2016, stayed unanswered.

It was in September, 2016, that it happened. As I randomly refreshed my emails, not thinking about that request anymore, sitting on my couch, it appeared. An actual answer. Asking me for my phone number, because I am living in France and therefore to make the shipping work out. MAKE THE SHIPPING WORK OUT. Meaning, they were sending me a book.

I looked at my sister and screamed. I got up and jumped. I screamed at everyone. For real. I answered with shaking hands right away and double, triple, trillion-checked my email before hitting send.

This email and this book somehow made me feel like I made it. Into some sort of secret book blogging clan, that now, I too, was playing with the big boys. ARCs are certainly not a way to make you feel like you’re doing good as a book blogger, okay. Don’t take this the wrong way. That’s the feeling I had at that moment, though.

I gained confidence again. I thought that I could do this. I really could. I probably could have years and years ago, just as well, if I didn’t give up. Maybe. I will never know. There were a couple books I thought I could really show some love, so I tried again. Sending emails Getting no answers at all.

Hoping.

Seeing NetGalley restricting their titles to international book bloggers and everything disappearing on “wish for it”.

Losing hope.

Getting a random answer months later. Screaming.

Losing hope again.

Getting a wish granted.

Crying.

ARCs have always been a rollercoaster for me especially as an international blogger. And where am I now? Waiting. Wishing. Sending an email. Forgetting about it. Waiting. Wishing Again. Disappointment, then happiness. As always. But most of it all, not relying on it, because ARCs are a privilege, an honor, something I cherish and will always feel really grateful for, but not something I take for granted ever.

Getting ARCs isn’t the end of it all, as a book blogger, nor does it define your worth or well-doing in the community. Sometimes it feels strange, sometimes it feels completely random. Sometimes, especially as international book bloggers, it can feel, yes, unfair. And sometimes it’s happiness knowing you’re holding a book by one of your favorite author of all times.

I know firsthand how complicated and nerve-racking it is to be an international book blogger already, especially regarding ARCs. We all have our share of struggles and there are so many things we can’t change. There is also a whole bunch of love in this community, for books, and for each other, too.

So whether you’re one super lucky blogger requesting and getting everything you want, or an international blogger, like me, terrified to hit send on an email… keep on going. Keep on spreading the love for books. Whether they’re ARCs, or NOT. Because, like I said, ARCs aren’t the end of it all. It’s your love for books that matters and not the amount of ARCs you might or might not get and, despite the ecstatic feeling I get when I manage to get lucky, I never, ever want to forget that. Because whether you get ARCs, or not, it’s okay. You’re doing okay. You’re loving books and screaming that love and it’s all that matters.

This kind of ended up being really rambly and probably not making a whole lot of sense. Still, I wanted to share my story, so here I am. If you made it until there, thank you for reading.

What is your story with ARCs? I’d love to hear about your feelings, thoughts and struggles, too, because despite everything, ARCs are still something “big”, apparently, here in the blogging community. Let me know your thoughts in comments!

Posted by

Book blogger, travel blogger, writer. πŸ“š |🌍 | πŸ’ž Writing & Communications Graduate. French. Living on love, wanderlust and ya books.

106 thoughts on “My story with ARCs as an international book blogger

  1. I can totally relate to this. I’ve gotten lucky with some publishers before but then their PR person changed and I had to start all over again. I now have a personal blog where I still occasionally review books, but it’s no longer my priority to read and review to-be-releases books. However, when I do get that rare opportunity, I take it!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh thank you, I’m glad you could relate to this post! πŸ™‚
      I get it, and as great as these opportunities are, there are so many books to be read that are already released, too πŸ˜€
      Thank you so much! πŸ˜€

      Like

  2. Wow, how is it you always write amazing posts? Like, every single one is great and I love it. I have yet to sign up for Netgalley or Edelweiss or to even email a publisher because, YIKES SCARY. I don’t handle rejection well (but then again, who does really?), so the whole prospect seems pretty daunting. I would love an ARC of a book – an ebook or a physical copy, I don’t care – but it feels sort of unattainable? I hope one day I’ll reach that goal! It really makes me so sad that international bloggers get the short end of the stick regarding stuff like this. Sigh.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh wow you’re way too sweet, thank you Kat, this means so much 😭😭😭
      I understand that completely – even after trying out more than one time, the prospect never gets less daunting. I’m sorry, I wish I could reassure you πŸ˜‚ that being said, if it feels like an unattainable goal maybe for now, let me tell you that it is not and I am certain that you can and will get some of these great opportunities, too ❀ Sometimes you just need to take a leap of faith and you can do this, plus you're incredible!! ❀ I'm here if you need anything or tips or something ❀

      It's complicated for international bloggers, it is true. Anyhow, whether we get ARCs or not does not make us less of a blogger, nor does that make us any less awesome πŸ˜€ ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Marie, thank you for sharing this, because I experience the same on Netgalley and I’m in Kenya. It sucks to want to read a book and then get a regret email that I do not qualify because of my geographical location. I’ve never heard of Edelweiss too until I read this post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh I completely understand your frustration – and I am so sorry you’re experiencing this, too. I hope and know that someday you will get this kind of opportunity, don’t give up ❀
      Thank you so much for stopping by! πŸ˜€

      Liked by 1 person

  4. My first ARC wasn’t too long ago and the writer actually approached me! I never heard of him or his book before, but it was his debut. It felt SO GOOD tbh. I got my first review request only a month before. I tried requesting books before that, but didn’t really have luck, but it got me on the mailing list of Titan Books. I got a copy of the God of War novelization through it. Currently doing a juggle with several reading copies of which 2 are physical copies.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh wow that’s incredible, what a great opportunity! I’m so happy this happened to you, it must have felt so great πŸ˜€
      It’s amazing that you are getting physical copies, too, yay! πŸ˜€ I’m happy to hear about your success πŸ˜€
      Thank you so, so much for stopping by!

      Like

  5. I’m glad you were finally able to get a physical ARC. That’s awesome. Shipping books overseas is expensive, so I’m happy that some companies are willing to do it. My own ARC story is boring: I’ve never requested one. I have zero desire to be part of the blogger drama they seem to cause. I’ll stick to reviewing backlist books.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It really is expensive and I completely understand why some publishers won’t do it. It is a bit frustrating, obviously, but understandable too.
      It’s not boring at all! I think it’s great that you and most likely other bloggers are not too into the ARCs thing. If, in the end, I personally find that really exciting, I know it causes some drama too, and there are so many great releases already to read, too πŸ˜€
      Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts on the topic! πŸ˜€

      Like

  6. wonderful post, Marie! I have an okay relationship with arcs. When I started blogging I saw them as the best thing ever. While they still are, I’ve been pulling back from requesting like I used to. The added stress of reading before a deadline and the envy of seeing others get arcs that I can’t really took a toll on me. Lately, I have just been reading back listed titles.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh thank you so much, I’m happy you enjoyed it πŸ˜€
      I understand your feelings – I have been really selective and trying to restrain myself, too, because it sometimes gets a bit overwhelming, even just to ask for things and/or to see the anticipated titles in everyone’s hands, too. It’s good to focus on backlisted titles, too πŸ˜€ ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I’m in the U.S. so I’ve certainly had more luck when it come to getting ARCs, but I do want international bloggers to know that not all U.S. book bloggers get a lot of ARCs – I know it sucks if you never get any and I’m not comparing the two, just trying to make people feel a bit better. I’ve been blogging for 11 years now and I don’t get accepted for all Netgalley requests, and I rarely get physical ARCs. It sucks sometimes to see people getting all sorts of books you’d LOVE to have, but you’re right, it’s not all that blogging is about. Thanks for sharing your thoughts, and I hope you continue to get lucky with future ARCs!!

    -Lauren
    http://www.shootingstarsmag.net

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh no you’re absolutely right to mention that – I agree and I know that not all U.S bloggers get a lot of ARCs, it is really a case-by-case thing, even if sometimes geography helps a little bit, it does not do everything. I wish I understood the exact mechanics behind this system, just out of curiosity πŸ˜€
      Thank you so, so much for your sweet comment, Lauren, and I agree, it’s important to remember that it’s not all that blogging is about ❀

      Like

  8. This might be one of my favorite posts you’ve ever written, I don’t know much about ARC’s, but this post was just so personal and even…dare I say it, different from what you normally post. This wasn’t as lighthearted as your other posts, and I feel like I got to actually know you and your feelings through this post. I’m sorry to hear you have such a hard time receiving ARC’s. You’re such an amazing book blogger (I tell you all the time that you are actually my favorite), and so it sucks to hear you don’t get the same privileges, or at least your have a harder time receiving what others do, because of your location. Keep doing you babe, because you are AMAZING, and if it weren’t for you, my love for reading would have probably diminished a bit, and I wouldn’t have found so many amazing books that you’ve recommended to me over the past year and a half! xxx

    Melina | http://www.melinaelisa.com

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh wow, Melina, thank you so much for your comment, this really makes me happy ❀ I was a bit nervous to write and post this, because yes it feels and is written in a bit more personal way, but I am so happy that you enjoyed reading it ❀ It's always a bit stressful to lay out my feelings like this about things, in a less, lighthearted way, but it feels good, too πŸ™‚
      Thank you so, so, so, so much for your sweet words and your comment Melina, this honestly made my day so much better ❀ ❀ ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Thank you so much for sharing this personal post with us, Marie πŸ’—
    I resonated with a lot of things you talked about regarding Arcs (it’s often an up an down for us international bookworms) and especially the end really touched me! Meaning that I teared up a lot, because you really managed to make me feel understood, so thank you for the touching words πŸ˜­πŸ’•β€

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh Caro, thank you so, so, so, so much for your sweet words, I am so happy you enjoyed reading this post and that you could relate to it, in a way, thank you so much 😭 It is true that us international bookworms have it a bit harder, but we’re not giving up and that does not make us less than passionate about what we do, so that’s what matters ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Well Marie I am exactly like you hoping losing hope yet trying again, getting no anwser…telling myself that no my blog is not bad or less than others yet that’s damn hard!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. OH I completely understand – it is hard sometimes not to feel a little let down by it all. But whether you get ARCs or not does not make you a bad blogger or does not say that your blog isn’t FANTASTIC (because it really is). In the end, I don’t know all the mechanics and how everything works, but I think it’s important to, despite always hoping and wishing and wanting, to also be proud of what we do and the love we put into our blogs, ARCs or not ❀ and you should and can be proud of yourself!
      Thank you so much for your comment Sophie ❀

      Like

  11. This is such a great post! I’m in the US, so it’s easier for me. At least for netgalley and edelweiss. Physical books have been so hit or miss for me. I’ve sent a lot of e-mails and only received a couple that I requested. Most of my e-mails are ignored, but I keep trying. I have gotten some of my physical arcs from doing blog tours.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s great! It’s sometimes hard to understand the whole mechanics behind this, but I guess all we can do is do our best and keep on being ourselves πŸ™‚
      Thank you so much for your sweet comment! πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I have recently almost stopped requesting books from NetGalley because I felt my TBR is large enough without adding ARCs to it. I feel much better for it. Less pressure. I still keep an eye on NetGalley in case there is something I REALLY want to read, but actually I am quite happy to concentrate on the books I already have on my shelves or on my Kindle.

    Yes, ARCs are nice, but they do distract from the myriad of fantastic books you may already have on your shelf. I am quite happy to let that go for now. Sometimes I feel there is too much emphasis on new books. That is just for me personally though. I love a new book as much as the next person, but I also love my old books πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree with you so much about this – sometimes there is such a pressure to read all of the latest releases and there is also a lot of focus on new releases and upcoming ones – I guess that’s part of us, though, hyping up new books, but it’s true that sometimes, we tend to forget the older books. That is frustrating at times and I know that personally I also want to try and do better with that, too πŸ™‚
      I love that you focus on old releases, too, yay! πŸ˜€ ❀
      Thank you so much for your comment! ❀ ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I don’t ever request physical copies of books. If there’s a giveaway or something I’ll enter and get copies that way but I’m ok with must get e-Arcs. Now, as you know I live in the US and get rejected maybe 15% of the time. I know we have it good over here!

    Like

  14. Marie thank you so much for sharing your experiences with ARCs as an international blogger. It warms my heart that you were finally able to get a physical ARC and I can only guess at your excitement! I wish there was a solution for getting ARCs to amazing international reviewers, but I do understand the expenses involved. It’s a shame NG restrictions have exacerbated the issue of access.

    Great post as always, Marie!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh thank you so, so much, I am so happy you enjoyed reading this ❀ I get how complex it is to get ARCs especially as an international blogger and I wish there were solutions, thankully I have heard of some publishers sending internationally, and I am happy there are some willing to do that πŸ˜€
      Thank you for your sweet words and support – and for everything you do, too, about this ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  15. I have felt your pain as well as far as approval for ARCs goes. We do have some great pubs in Canada that do send out limited physical ARCs, and on occasion they send a finished copy for review. I have been fortunate to get those NG approvals and I am so grateful for them. I have actually tried to include backlist reviews on my blog more often these days, and to be honest, they get just as many views. As long as you’re happy and having fun, it’s all good. I would much prefer a baguette as well. πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh thank you so, so much for sharing your thoughts and for your sweet comment ❀
      I am so happy you are lucky with ARCs and yay for reviewing backlist titles, too. These are so important and sometimes often forgotten in the sea of all the new releases.
      You're so right, what matters is that we are having fun with it all πŸ™‚
      Thank you!! ❀ ❀

      Like

    1. Oh well that’s good! And don’t worry too much about it – even if I know how hard that is to do haha. You’re doing your very best and request whenever you feel ready to. No matter what the answer is, you’re still an incredible blogger πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  16. I’m not an international blogger, so I don’t have to deal with jumping through hoops for NetGalley and Edelweiss. My requests for physical ARCs really haven’t worked out—now that I’ve been blogging for years, some publishers have me on their lists and I do get some ARCs in the mail, but for requests it’s still wait and see … and wait … and wait. I’m glad you got your wish, though, and ended up getting a few prized ARCs now and again. Don’t give up!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am… to be completely honest I am amazed that some people get in publishers’ lists and are getting books in the mail like that, sometimes. That’s something that never fails at making me, like, shocked, in a way. I find that really cool haha πŸ˜€
      Requesting books is really a wait and see kind of situation, and wait, and wait, and wait some more. It’s a bit stressful, but we’re doing our very best and who knows, positive answers might come when we least expect it. Or I want to believe that πŸ˜€
      Thank you so much for your sweet words and support, Nicole! ❀

      Like

  17. This is such a great post to put out into the book blogging community, because I’m sure every single book blogger has, at least momentarily, desperately wanted arcs when they first learn about their existence πŸ˜‡

    That phase happened to me last year, and because I live in the U.S. & in such a big city, I had no problems at all getting arcs. I could ask the librarian if I could rummage through the large box of arcs that the city library system gets every few months; and even joined a book club at a local book store that read arcs to discuss. I repeat — there was a book club based on reading arcs! And I got to *keep* those arcs afterwards! πŸ˜† After a while, the magic of arcs sort of wore off on me, and I reverted back to reading older books or releases as they came out. But I realize that my situation is unique… and very, very lucky 😊

    Anyways, thank you so much for writing this post! It’s always so interesting and educational to read about your experiences as an international book blogger, and I think it’s even more wonderful that arcs are such a precious and magical thing for you. I wish you the best of luck in getting more arcs of books that you love in the future! 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh thank you so, so much Zoie for your sweet words and comment, I am so happy you enjoyed reading this post ❀

      This sounds like such a dream to me, walking on arcs just like that – having a book club! getting them easily! that seems like another world haha. I am happy that some people are really lucky like that, though, and you're right – it's good to focus and to love older books, too, I find that there's something great in every book anyway, whether they're old or new πŸ˜€
      Thank you so, so, so much for your sweet words and comment, this means the world ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  18. I’m so touched by your post, I’ve lived and gone through everything that you have gone through, as an intl blogger it’s always a thousand times more difficult than for others and even so, here we are, sharing our love for books because it’s what makes us happy and sometimes it’s fine because we’re going to continue no matter what, but there are days when the fact of being left out due to the place where you live sucks and is unfair, because I don’t think anyone works as hard as Intl bloggers. It’s an incredible post honey and everyone should read it to understand us a bit more πŸ’•πŸ’•πŸ’•πŸ’•

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh thank you so, so, so, so very much for your sweet words and comment, this honestly means the world to me ❀ I am so happy you enjoyed this and you're so right. If it is a bit more complicated for us, what matters the most is that we continue to share our love for books ❀ ❀ Thank you so, so much ❀ ❀ ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Oh Marie, thank you so much for sharing your journey and story with ARCs with us!! πŸ’ž You write in such a beautiful and inspiring way, I love it. I have to admit, I get jealous too when I see other people reading ARCs of my most anticipated releases, but I remind myself that ARCs aren’t everything. And I honestly don’t think I’ll ever try to request an ARC, because my blog isn’t that big, or great (in my opinion), haha. πŸ˜… Thank you for writing this post again! This is such a great post, honestly, with such an important message for all of us book bloggers. ❀️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I feel like my comment was all over the place and confusing haha, sorry!! But I just wanted to say one last thing: “You’re loving books and screaming that love and it’s all that matters.” That’s such an amazing statement and SO TRUE. And I’ll always look forward to screaming about books with you, hehe. πŸ’—

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Oh Dezzy, you’re going to make me cry, you are way too sweet! ❀ ❀ Thank you so, so much for your sweet words, this means a lot ❀
      And honestly – you ARE an incredible blogger and you should be proud of everything you do, you have such a wonderful blog, so aesthetic and pretty and your blog posts and everything is so inspired and INCREDIBLE, too. When you feel ready and if you want to, you should not be afraid, because I am certain you will get opportunities someday ❀ ❀

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Awww oh my gosh Marie, this comment actually made my day!! πŸ˜­πŸ’žπŸ’ž You’re honestly the kindest and most supportive person ever. I appreciate your friendship and support for me as a blogger SO much!! Thank you so much; this means the world to me. I can say the same to you, because your blog is one of my favorites and I just love reading all of your posts. Your blogging voice is amazing ❀️

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  20. This is the most relatable post, ever. You’ve basically described my blogging life, except for the fact that I am too scared to ask for physical copies at this point when e-ARCs are already becoming unavailable to me.

    I also sometimes get annoyed with the ARC thing. I think it’s a mixture of annoyance and envy which, I know, isn’t very nice of me. But when I see U.S. vloggers get a copy of a sequel without even having read the previous books, it’s a hard pill to swallow for me. It makes me sad to get denied for books from authors I have been screaming about for 4 years now. Don’t get me wrong, I understand the limitations and the privilege of ARCs even existing. Still…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh thank you so much for your sweet words, Jolien, I am happy you could relate to this ❀
      I completely understand your nervousness about requesting physical copies, I know I used to, and still always am, whenever I am trying to draft an email. But I've heard, and I have experienced it too, even if not so much, that some sweet publishers are willing to send to international bloggers books, so it's not impossible, not at all! πŸ˜€

      I completely understand your feelings here. It's something that has been a bit bothering me, too, especially regarding the sequels thing. If the person didn't even read the first book, why get a sequel to them? I…. I don't think I'll ever understand that :/
      Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts ❀ ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  21. I’m glad you decided to post this on the end Marie, I loved reading your story when it comes to ARCs. I tried sending out a few emails when I first started out blogging, but I never heard back from the majority of the publishers and it’s really disheartening. Most of the time I use NetGalley, because it’s more accessible for me (I live in the UK so I didn’t get restricted the same way international bloggers did) and because I mainly read on my Kindle and eARCs are just easier for me.
    Now given how long my TBR list is I don’t bother sending emails, I’ll either request on NetGalley if it’s ever available or wait for the actual release. ARCs do sometimes feel like an exclusive club, and I never got in so now I don’t really try that much. :/
    Anyways great post, I loved reading it and despite the ups and downs there’s no feeling quite like seeing that email in your inbox is there? πŸ™‚ ❀️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh thank you so, so, so much Beth, this means a lot ❀ ❀
      I understand, and sometimes ARCs are not all there is, really. There are so many incredible books already released out there to be read,too. I think with blogging, and I know it happens to me, seeing ARCs everywhere makes me want to be part of it all, too in a way haha.
      Agree. Despite the ups and downs and disappointment, when and if I get another email like that it is the best feeling, ever. ❀
      Thank you so much!! ❀

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That’s all right. πŸ™‚ ❀️
        Yeah, and if your TBR list is anything like mine is you have plenty of backlisted books to get around to. I know what you mean, some bloggers haul posts are filled with ARCs and I just want to know how they do it (likely it’s just that they live in the US)
        That’s all right. πŸ™‚ ❀️

        Liked by 1 person

  22. I can totally relate to this post! sometimes publishers do send out ARC copies to the international bloggers who has huge social network. I’ve seen some people don’t even have a blog except for an Instagram account with large number of followers. I stopped caring about not getting ARC’s but sometimes I do get a little jealous.
    Thanks for this wonderful post! 😁

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh I agree about the instagram thing. I do not have a bookstagram, but I sometimes notice that people on bookstagram, and only there, also manage to get review copies. It just shows how social media gets even more important, sometimes, which is… a little frustrating, I guess? In the end, I am just really curious to see how everything really works, behind the scenes, haha, if only I could πŸ™‚
      Thank you so, so much for your sweet comment, Raven, I’m so happy you enjoyed it πŸ˜€

      Like

  23. Loved this post, Marie πŸ™‚ I relate to you on so many levels because of being an International. Unless you have big numbers it is quite difficult to get arcs. I am too afraid to write emails to publishers asking about arcs. I have only done so for an Indian publisher though and thankfully they accepted my request.

    I used to worry about arcs a lot, you know, when I started. And that’s why I have tons of NetGalley pending arcs. But as they started hoarding up, I realised that I can’t read them all. So now, my arc requesting was a waste. I feel jealous each time an Indian blogger/bookstagrammer get international arcs/books but at the same time, I am not confident enough to see the rejection.

    But I really hope that someday I will be a bigger name and I can have some courage to finally write emails to the publishers πŸ˜›
    Thank you for writing this post though. It is wonderful πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh thank you so, so much Sim, I am so happy you enjoyed this post ❀ ❀ And YAY for getting approved from an Indian publisher, that's amazing πŸ˜€

      I understand your thoughts – and I felt the very same way, when I first started requesting, then gave up for, well…. two whole years. It didn't bother me, really, and I knew I couldn't handle the wait and rejection, too, at that time. I'm feeling a little more confident to try and send emails every now and then, but I'm still not ready for the rejections, but well…. if I never try, I guess I'll never know haha πŸ™‚

      I am certain that, when you feel ready, you will have incredible opportunities, your blog looks and IS amazing and so are you ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  24. Thanks for sharing, Marie! I noticed. Netgalley being more restrictive with ARCs and I. Just. Wow. As if they couldn’t make it more difficult for those who aren’t privileged enough to be in the US, like we basically chose the country to be born in right in the womb. πŸ€·πŸ»β€β™€οΈ Being a US reviewer, I consider myself super lucky to get ARCs more than others are able to. I’ve never requested a physical copy since my anxiety screams at me constantly from the back of my head, but I do get the occasional unsolicited one from one publisher? Or used to? πŸ€”

    I’m glad you did get an ARC eventually! Don’t ever lose hope – one day maybe the publishing world will change to include more international readers rather than constantly getting their hopes up and letting them down. ☺️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so, so much for your sweet comment, Sophia! ❀
      It is a little frustrating to see all of the restrictions, even if I can understand that shipping costs are really big at times, and maybe rights' things are complicated, too, but still.. sometimes, it's hard, especially when we see that it's just because of geography :/
      Thank you so, so, so much for your sweet words, this means a lot ❀ ❀ ❀

      Like

  25. this is SUCH a sweet sweet wholesome post. your story is so inspiring and motivating 😭😭 you deserve all the arcs ever.

    i’m so glad you finally got an answer back, i swear i was so invested in your story when you mentioned you got a reply i GENUINELY GOT EXCITED lol πŸ’–πŸ’–

    Liked by 1 person

  26. It’s so hard to stay motivated when you’re constantly getting ‘no’ and being straight up ignored. You work so hard though Marie – you’re the hardest working blogger I know! – and so I firmly believe that these successes will come to you because you’ve earned them. xx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It is a bit complicated to understand all of the mechanics behind ARCs. All we can do is keep on spreading our love for books and hope for the best. And there are tons of new releases we can talk about, too, SO many books to read ahah πŸ˜€ ❀
      Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts!! ❀

      Like

  27. I’m very proud of you, Marie! ❀
    I keep on telling you that you deserve all the ARCs you want because your content is amazing, your dedication is astounding and it's really such a loss for the publisher who would decline you just because you're international. But both of us know how things work, sadly 😦
    I'm starting to feel better about this aspect of being an international book blogger, I try to focus on the books I can get and review and forget about the publishers who won't work with me due to territorial aspects. It's hard sometimes, especially when I see an US/UK blogger talk about a certain book that I want so much, but I try to tell myself that it's okay, I'll get that book when it comes out, it's not the end of the world. Still sucks sometimes.
    I love your post and I'm glad you shared your feelings! ❀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. MARTA 😭 you are way, way too sweet, thank you so much for your sweet words 😭❀️
      I agree with you completely. Some days, it’s hard, especially when you see a book you’ve been dreaming of for so long. But then again, I guess there’s nothing we can do but continue on doing our best with everything that we can and keep on loving books and screaming about them πŸ˜€ ❀
      Thank you so, so much, you're too sweet ❀️❀️

      Like

    1. Oh no! I’m so sorry that happened to you, wow 😦 I understand, it’s always better to get a no than get your hopes up, just to end up being disappointed :/
      Thank you so, so much for your comment ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  28. I’m so glad you shared your story. I think that putting yourself out there to ask for an ARC is terrifying and so I applaud you for each and every time you reached out. As a new baby blogger the thought of sending an email to a publisher is super intimidating, and I plan on just trying my luck with NetGalley for now. But your story gives me courage that someday I too will send an email to a publisher and join all the other bloggers waiting for a response.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh I’m so, so happy this could encourage you – I know how hard and intimidating it feels to send just an email, especially as you start out, but I hope you’ll find the courage to do so. I am certain that once you do, you will be able to get great opportunities πŸ˜€ ❀
      Best of luck for everything and thank you so, so much for sharing your thoughts! πŸ˜€

      Like

  29. Thank you for this post, I really enjoyed reading about your experience with ARCs ❀ as a fellow international blogger I've certainly had a whole lot of rejections from publishers, but I am lucky enough to live in New Zealand and most publishing houses with an office here are quite willing to send review copies of books, and occasionally I do get the odd ARC which I always cherish. I definitely think it's harder for international bloggers to get ARCs and physical review copies in general but we shouldn't stop trying. And also, everyone contributes something to this community, so ARCs shouldn't be used to define worth.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh you’re so welcome, thank you so, so much for your sweet words, I am so happy you enjoyed this post ❀
      Agree – if it's a bit more complicated, we are all doing our very best and we shouldn't give up πŸ™‚
      AGREE 100% with this – we all contribute in different ways to the book blogging community and ARCs, if they're a nice perks, should not define our worth or our work, at all πŸ™‚
      Thank you so much!!

      Liked by 1 person

  30. Marie, I absolutely love this post – I think it’s really important to talk about the immense work international bloggers put into this community, and don’t get nearly enough perks in return. And you’re absolutely right – ARCs don’t define blogging in any way, but it’s also true that it’s lovely to have an indication that “hey, you’re doing good, so here’s a gift from us” in the form of an early copy. I can totally understand how disheartening it would be for an international blogger to send requests and have them unanswered just because of your location. But I’m really glad you got that ARC you wanted and I’m sure you’ll continue to receive many more in the future since your blog is fantastic and so are you. β™₯️

    ~ Aimal @ Bookshelves & Paperbacks

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh Aimal, thank you so, so, so much for your sweet words and comment, this means the world to me β™₯️
      I agree, if ARCs does not define blogging in any way, they are a nice perk indeed πŸ™‚
      Thank you so, so much, your sweet words really make me emotional, ahh β™₯️β™₯️β™₯️

      Like

  31. Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts on this! ARCs ARE very complicated. I still feel the whole “what’s wrong with me!?” thing. Because as much as everyone swears up and down that it isn’t a sign of importance and achievement… on some level it kind of is? Like- it certainly isn’t the ONLY one, but as humans, how does it not sting a little when you get turned down for something you work really hard on? Plus- blogging is SO subjective, so sometimes ARCs can seem like the only tangible sign that we’re “progressing”. Again, this isn’t necessarily accurate but… I know it’s how I feel!

    And I can imagine it is extra frustrating to know that some of this is just because of rights and such- because it’s wholly out of your control, and that kind of sucks. So I am sorry that you’ve experienced that stuff too. Fabulous post!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m so glad you shared this – this is exactly how I feel as well, even if it’s no necessarily a “good” thing, ARCs can be an indicator of how much we grow and progress, too. Sometimes it’s very frustrating, especially since I will never quite understand the mechanics of them all ahah πŸ™‚

      Thank you so, so much for your sweet words Shannon, so happy you enjoyed this ❀

      Like

  32. Wow, this was my first time visiting you blog but it won’t be my last! I loved this post and how honest you are! I am US-based but I too struggle with feeling *good enough* to get ARCs… my stats aren’t amazing and I have a hard time balancing real life with time for blogging and reading. But your post reminded me it’s not about ARCs and all that… it’s just about reading and enjoying and spreading the love. Thank you!! ❀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh wow, thank you so, so much Jillian, your sweet words really mean a lot! ❀ I am so happy you enjoyed this post! ❀
      It is so hard to juggle with everything, but we're doing our best and we are passionate and that's what we should remember πŸ™‚
      Thank you again!! ❀ ❀

      Like

  33. I love how you structured this post! And I honestly didn’t know what ARCs were in the beginning at all. I thought why is everyone talking about story arcs and why are they capitalising the letters? I was confusion.
    Anyway, it really is a roller coaster to get ARCs and then lose hope just to be surprised by a publisher or author. I am so happy for you that you got a couple physical books by now. You are doing such a great job, you deserve them πŸ˜€

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I was SO confused at first, too, like, what is this strange language? πŸ˜‚
      Thank you Kat, you’re way too sweet ❀ I know it's silly sometimes to link ARCs to the fact that you're doing okay, but sometimes I can't help it πŸ˜‚ thank you, that means so much ❀ ❀ ❀

      Liked by 1 person

  34. I really appreciate all your posts about being an international book blogger, it really puts things into perspective for me. My relationship with ARCs has unfortunately not been a positive one. I started blogging back in 2016. When I heard about NetGalley, I immediately created an account and hit the request button for EVERY book. I had zero clue what I was doing. 75 approvals later, I am STILL trying to clear out my NetGalley ARC backlog. I feel awful for what I did. Not only is it not fair to the authors & publishers, but it isn’t fair that I got approved for so many books (that remain unread) when there are international bloggers like you that didn’t even have the chance. Since 2016, I have NOT requested any new NetGalley titles, and am still working through them. I promise once I clear them all out, I’ll never abuse the process ever again.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh thank you so, so, so much Amanda, this means a lot to me that you enjoy these kind of posts ❀
      Wow, I understand how you can feel a bit overwhelmed by it all! I'm not blaming you at all though, in your position I most likely would have gone a little crazy if I could request all the books I wanted ahah πŸ™‚ I'm happy though that this made you think ❀ ❀ Thank you so much Amanda!! ❀

      Liked by 1 person

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