ARCs : privilege, pressure, or a little bit of both?

Good morning, good afternoon, good evening, friends! I hope your week is going great so far. I’m thrilled – and a bit nervous – to be back today with another of my blogging discussion. As always, talking about subjects we bloggers, and book bloggers in particular, struggle with, and speaking with an open mind and sharing my thoughts. I hope you’ll enjoy it, and want to share yours too with me. Today’s subject is kind of a controversial one, but it’s been on my mind lately, so… let’s talk about these ARCs.

blogging ways

I don’t know about you, after all, every blogger’s adventure and beginning is different, but when I started, I had no ideas ARCs existed, or were such a thing. For those of you unfamiliar with that term, ARC stands for Advance Reader Copy, and to sum it up in two words, it’s getting lucky enough to be able to read and review a book prior to its release date. Since I am French and currently living in France, I have no such privilege as to get that many ARCs, especially physical ones. There’s always, obviously, this pang of jealousy whenever I hear about people getting books I am DYING to read, and well, getting advance copies, screaming and fangirling about it, while I’m here, like, I’m waiting for my turn to join in the fun.

waiting

But getting an ARC really is a privilege, and if there’s this bit of jealousy which makes us all human, there’s also the part of me that feels happy such bloggers get this chance, this privilege, really, even if I, don’t. It really shows that, as bloggers, we get to read them before, root for them, stand for them and make incredible promotions for great titles. We have this power, not only because of ARCs but because of a little plateform on the internet where someday we decided it was okay to shout some nonsense about the books we love into the void. Except, not really. We don’t. Shout into the void, I mean, because with this, our voice are HEARD, and ACCOUNTED FOR. ARCs get attention to the book prior the release date, ARCs make an incredible deal of publicity for the book, for the author, and it’s something both bloggers and authors are grateful for, and should be grateful for.

awesome

Countless dramas started because of ARCs as well. Why did he/she get one, while I’m here waiting? Am I no better than this? This obviously raises a LOT of insecurities in the bloggers’ minds, and in mine as well. I’m not going to lie, when you ask and get refused for a book you have been dying to read, it’s disappointing. It’s crushing, even, and it makes us wonder if we get enough followers, enough attention, or if our blog is good enough. But publishers have limited ARCs so I guess that’s it. I try not to take it personally, even if it’s hard, at times. And blogging isn’t blogging for ARCs, it’s blogging for yourself after all, isn’t it ? To be honest, getting them is a privilege, but if you’re here ONLY because of this, and by that I mean your only goal is this, then… this community wasn’t made for this (well, I think it wasn’t). And I came here for something else, for some bookish love.

friend

Then there’s the pressure. You’re getting something, why are you complaining, you ask ? Because ARCs ARE work. It’s not doing complicated math or trying to resolve an equation to save the world, thankfully, but it still takes time and energy to read and review the book, and no one found out yet how to make days grow longer. There’s also the pressure of enjoying it, because if I’m getting a privilege at all, I don’t want to be too disappointed. The thoughts of wanting to thank people for this with a good review. Not necessarily good because you loved the book, but good because it’s a review you put work in, showing you actually care about this privilege. It’s important. Or at least, I think it is.

So swallow back that jealousy, I tell myself. Ask, and sometimes you might get lucky. But also remember you’re blogging for BOOKS and the community, NOT ARCs. Read and love what you want, before anything else. Don’t let yourself slowly devoured by ARCs. Stop asking too much, and stop saying yes too much – or no. Give books a chance, but if you’re overwhelmed, just stop. From now on, this is my motto. Less stress from getting demands I can’t, or don’t want to answer – because there is no shame in not being interested by one book. More want, because I only ask for things I really want to read. Less jealousy because whatever if I didn’t get this ARC. My TBR is already waiting to swallow me whole. Be thankful, and try not to let the pressure get to you. Love blogging and everything it can bring. Advance Reader Copies, or not.

What do you think about ARCs? Do you often ask for them, and where? Do you ask publishers directly? (I haven’t. Ever. Because I live in France and well, no one will send me book I guess? Tips on this are most welcome)

Do you feel a bit pressured about reading ARCs on time? What are some struggles and thoughts you have about these? Let’s chat in comments! ๐Ÿ’ฌ

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Book blogger, travel blogger, writer. ๐Ÿ“š |๐ŸŒ | ๐Ÿ’ž Writing & Communications Graduate. French. Living on love, wanderlust and ya books.

108 thoughts on “ARCs : privilege, pressure, or a little bit of both?

  1. I do feel pressured sometimes because, since I started blogging, I’ve joined readathons, there are books I’d love to read that I’ve found through other bloggers, I’ve got books sent by indie/self-published authors that need reading and reviewing and then I also request ARcs from NetGalley and Edelweiss. You sum it all up and you’ve got yourself a bunch of books per month that you NEED to get through because you’ve promised feedback and sometimes there’s a deadline date, like the release date or the time when the ARC expires. Though it is a lot of work and pressure at times, I do love it and appreciate that the option exists. There’s been books I never would have read if I hadn’t gotten the ARC. Especially since it’s a struggle to get books where I live. I do understand the pang of jealousy because I never get the big hyped books haha. But I am a small blogger and an international one, so I know my chances are never the best ๐Ÿ˜›
    I never thought about the privilege, so it’s a good perspective to gain, thank you!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much Esther! Right? The pressure is real, and I think we bloggers have the tendency of wanting to read ALL THE BOOKS, but well, days need to be way longer for us to do it all ahah. You’re so welcome, thank YOU for your lovely comment and for sharing your thoughts with me about this โค

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I tend to get accepted for quite a few E arcs when I request them, physical copies are far and few because I live in Germany – and sometimes it’s like … I don’t even know how to fit in this book with everything else I am doing/reading and do I really need to sleep or can I just skip that bit if my life!! It’s a lot of work, but definitely rewarding, I think.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. This is a great post! I had to smile when I saw the title and it started with privilege as I wrote a post a while ago about ARC’s that had privilege in the title! It was more about the golden rules of 500 followers and 6 months of blogging though but if your interested in reading it the link is: https://thetattooedbookgeek.wordpress.com/2016/09/15/arcs-an-occasional-privilege-for-all-and-not-a-monopoly-for-the-few-yall/

    I don’t really feel pressure from ARC’s, I did at the start as i thought that I had to read them before the release date however it soon became apparent that lots of bloggers have ARC’s that were released months ago and they haven’t yet read them or are only just reviewing them, recent books that I can think of are Nevernight and Dark matter, lots of ARC reviews weeks and months after the books have been released and I even saw an ARC review for a book that was released in May the other week! ๐Ÿ™‚

    I request a few ARC’s however I have been lucky enough to get on mailing lists, I’m in the UK so I know it’s different for other countries but I got on lists that are for publishers of the books that I usually read and, I’m on four and three of the four publishers send you press releases either just before or after the books release date asking if you would like to read the book or not, I have said no and declined far more than I have ever accepted as ARC’s/free books are a privilege and it wouldbe unfair to accept books that hold no interest to me when there willbe other bloggers out there who would really like the books.

    The fourth publisher has sent me a few books just in the post, surprise book mail, I’ve asked for a couple of books from them and reviewed them but with the surprise book mail I have asked the publicist directly as I thought that I was expected to read every book they send even though I haven’t requested the book and I asked them that, do I have to read the unsolicited books you send? And the answer is no, you don’t which for me was great as I didn’t want to have to read books and feel pressured to – I’m not a fast reader and my favoured genre of fantasy are large tomes that take a while to get through anyway! ๐Ÿ™‚

    I don’t think people should feel pressured to read ARC’s on time however I would say that if it’s an actual book that you request then I’d try my best to read it in time before the release as you asked for it. ๐Ÿ™‚

    But, for asking publishers directly, it’s not a big deal, they may say yes, they may say no, but they are generally polite no matter what and when asking a publisher just keep the email short and to the point and be polite, perhaps explaining why you would like the ARC – favourite author’s new book, next book in a series you really like, etc.

    Damn, I have just realised how long this comment is! Sincere apologies but ARC’s is one of the subjects I like to comment on.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Ohh thank you so much for sharing this post, I’ll go read it right now! And great minds think alike, I guess ๐Ÿ˜€
      I guess it takes a bit of time to feel less pressured to read all the books, and I also guess we have both to control ourselves, and know what we are capable of reading, and interested in reading, or not. It’s SO great you’re in publishers’ lists, I’d LOVE to ahah but I guess since I’m French reading in English this is less likely to happen? Also another reason why I don’t write to publishers, I feel like this will lessen my chances of being approved for anything, even for an e-ARC.
      No need to apologize, reading long and awesome comments like these after a long day is THE BEST. Thank you!! โค

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you.๐Ÿ˜€ It is great, granted it’s something I never expected to actually happen but then again I never expected to have a blog so it’s a really nice thing to happen.๐Ÿ˜€ I really wouldn’t know if being French reading in English would have an effect or not, I would doubt it though but if they’re English based publishers then they’d have shipping costs to France/a different country to think about but I don’t know the rules around that. I would say though if you wanted to request either an ARC or an e-ARC then give it a go as while I can only speak from personal experience every publicist I’ve dealt with has been very polite and helpful.

        Liked by 2 people

  4. I think ARCs are good for some people, but not for others. Personally I’ve never signed up for them, because I know I simply don’t have the time, and I would feel pressured to read the book quickly, and put together an amazing review – and I just plain have too many family commitments, and like you said, there are no more than 24 hours in a day.

    As an author, when it came to selecting ARCs for my first release, it was a first come, first serve basis. I started with folks who had already volunteered or answered my request for interviews/promotion. Otherwise, it was, drop me a line and send me a pitch. I only have a handful of ARC readers, because I’m doing everything myself (printing costs, putting together the sub boxes, etc.), and I simply can’t afford to send out 50 ARCs.

    But I think the international issue may be a thing! It’s not with me, I accept any request regardless of where you live. But I’m also independent, not a big publishing company.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I agree, really, I think that when you’re a book blogger, you see all the ARCs and feel a bit maybe this need to join in the fun? But I guess there’s no obligation, and that’s also why I decided to slow down on this a lot, because…well, time. There’s only so many hours in a day and so many books I want to read already.
      I think it’s so great that you’re choosing some people no matter where they’re from. I guess big publishers don’t do that too much sadly :/
      Thank you so much!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I didn’t know about ARCs when I started blogging either. I haven’t really got that many, only some hand-me-downs from a friend who owns a bookshop and passed them on after reading them. Shanti and I thought about signing up for NetGalley, for example, but we decided not to (they also said you had to be 18). to be honest, while I would love free, pre-release books India isn’t the best place to get them and I can live with that. I have so many other things to do and I like that reading isn’t work, you know? Anyway, this is such an important discussion and generally wonderful post. โค

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so, so much for your thoughts โค ANd I'm glad that you're sharing my struggles. Living in France, it's not the best place either to get sent free ARC copies, I guess we international bloggers have a hard time, ahah. I have gotten books from NetGalley before, and it's always great to browse and find new ideas of books you'd love to read. But it's also time-consuming. AND if you get approved, it's one more book to read, with a deadline most of the time. It's fun, and it's GREAT, but it's also a bit stressful.
      Thank you so, so much shar โค

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I just learned what arcs are and now I’m trying to request a few. I’m trying to directly ask publishers until I get a few more followers so there will be a higher chance to receive one. I really liked this post, it was nice to know another blogger has the same thoughts that I do! ๐Ÿ˜€

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Lately I’ve been feeling more and more pressure from ARCs and also author requests, which is why I am closed for review requests at the moment. It IS a massive privilege to get to read someone’s work beforehand, but it’s also a lot of responsibility. Being much of a mood reader doesn’t help either and then there’s my free-time TBR …
    I agree on all your points. GReat post!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I have been feeling overwhelmed for a while, actually. I shut down my review requests this summer, yet getting review requests by email breaks my heart because I feel guilty not answering them. But….I guess we can only have so many hours in one day, and I really want to focus on my TBR and the books I want to read before anything else. Thank you so, so much Kat! โค

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Great post, Marie! I didn’t know what an ARC was when I first started blogging too. And when I found out about the few bloggers that got the chance to get books to review, I was simply amazed. It simply came to me as GOALLZZ. I’ve reviewed a bunch of books for self-published authors for the mere pleasure of reading and discovering new voices that have a hard time reaching out to the world. I find reviews by bloggers is a fantastic way for them to spread the word, and I see ARCs as the next level of that. It’s definitely pressure if your time is already loaded with other things, and it definitely sucks if publishers can’t reach you cause of where you’re residing. I’m glad you’re able to see both sides of the coin and not have it get to your head too much! It’s always nice to see people get the chance to read amazing books and share them with the rest of the community ++ hype it up ++ have us join the bandwagon until we get our chance to read it. ๐Ÿ˜›

    – Lashaan

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so, so much Lashaan! ๐Ÿ™‚ I agree, there are so many books that we can discover this way, little books we never would have known about, at times, since they come from small publishing companies and stuff. I guess even if there’s a bit of jealousy at seeing other bloggers getting books I would LOVE to read, as well, it’s important to remind ourselves of the chance we get to read ARCs at all. Whether they’re from small publishers and authors, or big big names ๐Ÿ˜€ Thank you! โค

      Liked by 2 people

  9. Great post Marie. So far I’ve only ever requested ARCs from NetGalley; I never really got the hang of Edelweiss, and don’t really want to learn, and I haven’t quite worked up the courage to email publishers directly, maybe one day though. I don’t request too many from NetGalley, it’s only if I see a book I’m really interested in. There is always a limit on how many eARCs the publishers can give out and I’m not that interested I feel like I’d be taking the book away from someone who was.
    I have a couple of ARCs on my to-read list, I always try and review them before their release date, I know you probably don’t have to, I’ve seen ARC reviews for books that have been released already, but I like to try and post them beforehand. I always assume the point of ARCs is to drum up excitement for the book before its release you know, and get some pre-release reviews out there to gain more interest.
    I really enjoyed reading all your thoughts on this topic Marie, I agree it can be a controversial one at times! ๐Ÿ˜€

    Liked by 1 person

      1. That’s all right! โค I'm very aware of how I procrastinate a lot so it's better for me that I don't request too many ARCs because I'll never get around to them all in time. I think my limit is going to be three on NetGalley at any one time. Seems a sensible amount. ๐Ÿ™‚
        Yeah there's that pressure, but at the same time I find there's pressure if I don't review a book before the release date, like the longer I leave it the more anxious I get about it.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. For me, I don’t really request ARCs anymore. I used to think they were an awesome privilege, but then I got too greedy, requesting too many digital ARCs. As I couldn’t read most of them due to some health problems I had at the time, I then thought of them as pressure. So now, I just don’t request them, unless I really want to read them – I reckon that’s probably the best policy for ARCs for me!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Awesome discussion, Marie! We must’ve been channeling each other’s energy because I actually have an ARC discussion scheduled for next week. ๐Ÿ™‚ I almost changed it to today. Good thing I pushed it back. ๐Ÿ™‚ You’re right about it being about the community. I didn’t start my blog to get free books. I didn’t even think a publisher would give me a book since I don’t write for a magazine. I love getting ARCs, and if I receive them on time, I always try to make room in my schedule to read and review for the pub date. After all, that’s why they’re giving us the books. Not so we can stockpile them in our house or on our kindle for a rainy day. I think too many people ask for books they don’t want to read just to see if they will get them and have no interest in reading them. That’s wrong to do that and I don’t agree with accepting a book without the intention of reading it.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Fantastic post, Marie! I used to get major ARC envy with the bigger blogs when I first began blogging, for sure. But jealousy is a normal human emotion, right? All is good as long as we’re not nasty about it! Also, seeing those bloggers’ successes with being able to read free books sort of motivated me to be a better reviewer in hopes that could get my first ARC one day.
    To be honest, I do feel some pressure with reviewing ARCs for release dates. It’s been especially hard because of school and everything, but I do try my best to be on time. However, in result of my busyness I have had to sacrifice and prioritize certain ARCs. I no longer promise reviews (before release dates) for the unsolicited copies I receive. However, ones that I do request myself I’m pretty good with the “deadlines.”
    As for liking the galley or not… I used to feel really bad if I didn’t like the book I was sent, but now I’ve kind of gone numb to the situation because I know publishers prefer an honest review over a dishonest one. Plus, just because a review is negative (in the sense you didn’t like the ARC as much as you’d hope) doesn’t mean it isn’t a good review.
    In addition, I find there are other ways to promote books that you didn’t like or aren’t able to read (like in my case unsolicited galleys), such as taking photos on Instagram, tweeting that you’ve just received book mail, and including them in book haul posts. I suppose any form that “shares” or “publicizes” the book is coming out; and if you like it and can release a positive review that’s an extra bonus.
    Gosh, this comment is longer than I anticipated it’d be (sorry!), but overall I think receiving ARCs will always be a great honor because it’s so exclusive and built on a complex system just for reviewers.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so, so much! You are right, it’s only natural to feel a bit jealous and I guess We have to remind ourselves that We are at least a tiny bit lucky If We get anything at all ๐Ÿ˜Š Thank you for your thought on negative feedback, I Really need to think about this more. I always feel a bit guilty but I guess We can’t love all the Books, as long as We provide a justified review๐Ÿ˜Š

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I am on a few Street Teams and Blogger Tour Company lists so I’m offered ARCs often but I have learned to back off on how much I say yes. I used to be a fast reader but with health issues the last couple years I’ve had to slow down and only request or say yes to books I really really want to read.I do feel pressured to get them read on time because I know the authors look forward to that helping with sales near release day and with tours I have to read it on time(I have had some I couldn’t and felt bad about it).Oh and these are usually ebooks not hard copies.I’m ashamed to admit I envy those who seem to get a continuous flow of hard copies and by very popular authors. I still have yet to figure out how they accomplished that.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh yes, I guess publishers have like, bloggers’ faces labeled next to their ARCs haha, some very famous bloggers manage to get Great Books all the time. I guess they are lucky, but they also have to deal with a lot of pressure to read Books, I guess? I guess there are good and bad sides to this ๐Ÿ˜Š Thank you for stoppin by!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. I have always thought ARCs would be nice and all but I doubt I would get any because A) Canadian and B) my little patch of the internet won’t get big enough to really be something a publisher would want to spent their time and money on sending ARCs. And I’m fine with that. But every once and a while, like very recently, a book that I really really would love to have early comes along and I do wish that I could get my hands on ARCs. I just need to learn patience, though, as the book I really really want currently is not that far away from being published.

    But also, with ARCs I would feel obligated to review it higher (even without publisher/author asking) because it is an ARC and I want the book/author/publisher to do well because they were so nice, you know? But I also want my blog to accurately reflect what I think about things and not be ‘nice’ for the sake of getting in with publishers and authors for free books.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I get the struggle, living in France I dont even dare asking for any physical copies, I assume it would be too expensive and I’d never get any. But wherever You are from You can Try to request eARCs thanks to websites like netgalley, I got lucky in here sometimes๐Ÿ˜Š I get What You mean and I struggle with this as Well. I want to write good re views especially for Books I was lucky enough to get before anyone else, but I guess We can’t love everything. Summer commented before talking about negative re views, and I love What she said about It, If you want to read It! Thank you!๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š

      Liked by 1 person

  15. I’ve never signed up for ARCs before. Except one which was a Brandon Sanderson graphic novel and I couldn’t resist, but other than that I’ve had two people approach me to review their self published novels. I do feel a pressure to finish the book in a timely manner because I see it as a responsibility. They’ve entrusted me a copy of their work for me to review and share to the world in the hopes of reaching a wider audience, which sometimes make me feel like a fraud, because I don’t really get that many hits for reviews ๐Ÿ˜ฆ I also try to give them the best review I can (as in the writing, not the score).
    Also, all of them were ebooks. If France isn’t getting physical ARCs, I doubt Malaysia would be getting any, haha.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. THIS, thank you for this. I don’t get that many hits for reviews either, and it makes me feel so sad, and kind of, well, wrong, ahah. I always try to write the best review I can, as well, but sometimes…well when I really didn’t like the book, I still feel bad about it, aha.
      Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts! โค

      Liked by 1 person

  16. I wrote a reply to this yesterday and it seems to have been eaten – boo!
    Anyway, I get galleys (pre-ARCs) from places like Netgalley, who may well be willing to grant you digital versions of their books, especially when they know you can review in more than one language.

    Iโ€™ve never asked a publisher directly for an ARC, although I do interact with them on twitter and via their newsletters etc. Iโ€™m on the โ€œbloggers listโ€ for a couple of the publishers (e.g. Corvus) and I get the occasional ARC from them in the post.

    Iโ€™ve also gone to author events (so some of the authors ask me to read and review their books) and also go to bookstore events where new/pre-release books are available.

    Have you got a local bookstore that is already doing events? Or one willing to hold events, especially for local or less-well-known authors, where you can meet them and get their books โ€“ either for free or at a reduced rate? What are the French imprints to the big publishing houses (e.g. PRH) and are you talking to them on twitter? Letting them know when youโ€™re reviewed one of their books (that youโ€™ve brought) so they know your style of work and have you in their mind when setting up a bloggers list?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. WordPress sometimes acts weird ahah, thank you for taking the time to write this comment again! It’s so great you get to go to authors events and these kind of stuff. Since I’m living in France, and reading in English, I’m not really in contact with a lot of French publishers, since they publish in French and I’m not reviewing in French on my blog, it’s not really the same kind of audience I guess? I mean, I could probably advice all French publishers on which English books they should translate hahaha.
      Thank you so much for stopping by! ๐Ÿ™‚

      Like

      1. I have a friend whose brother, a bookseller, lives in Turkey. He knows I read a lot, and if I finish a suitable book, I offer it to him. It gets sent to turkey, where there is a bit of a market for people to read books in English. Either native speakers who now live out there, or those who want to practise reading in English. Is there something similar in France? I don’t know if you could make use of this angle?

        Anyway I would still talk to the publishers, take part in comps, let them know when you’ve reviewed one of their books etc. You never know what might happen!

        Like

  17. Great post, their is definitely a big pressure attached to ARCS. I always feel a bigger pressure when an author emails and asks if you would like to review their book (smaller authors of course). I used to feel like I had to say yes, that they were giving me this grand opportunity and I would be so rude to turn it down but then I realised I blog because I love reading and if I can’t do it because I haven’t got the time or I don’t think its for me that’s ok. This isn’t a job for me (I wish).
    I’ve found myself saying no and not requesting ARCS anymore because I just haven’t got the time in the midst of uni work,it’s not worth the pressure I put myself under and the stress!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much! I understand the feeling so, so well. I always hate turning down review requests, especially coming from small authors trying to make bloggers talk about their books and everything, but I guess we can only read so many books at a time, and we can’t do it all. I’m kind of doing the same, now, with work and life, I prefer to focus on the books I bought ahha ๐Ÿ™‚ Thank you!!

      Liked by 1 person

  18. I get this- even though I don’t know much about it cos I don’t actually do ARCs. I can imagine it’s pretty tough with all the competition for ARCs and desperately wanting to write a good review cos it’s such a privilege- which are kind of two of the reasons I don’t do it… haha so I guess I really do get it! ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Love this post! I think that as I have more blogging experience, I am less jealous of those who get the coveted ARCs. I really don’t request many that aren’t on NetGalley. I really do love getting and reading books before they release, but the shine has worn off, for sure. There are so many books on my shelf that need my attention, too! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  20. OOOHHH I totally feel you! I’m so jealous of people who receive ARCs of a really cool book but like you, I’ve never requested for ARC ever. I live in Indonesia and I’m pretty sure I won’t get them anyway… like if there’s me and someone whose blog stats are more or less similar to mine but lives in US or something, I think publishers would choose that person :’) but I do receive several from netgalley and there are also some indie/self-published authors who offer me their ARCs and finished copy for review.

    But even I’m so behind on that! Like, I have so many books I haven’t read and review and I realize that I might not enjoy receiving ARCs as much as I thought. It creates pressures and gives this ‘obligated’ feeling on reading. I’ve also seen a lot of bloggers felt overwhelmed by ARC and decided to stop receiving them altogether :’) I guess I prefer choosing my own books ๐Ÿ˜›

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so, so much! I think the same way, if there’s someone that’s in the US or UK and asks, well obviously they will be prioritized,s o…well, I don’t even try ahah. I agree, it gives some kind of pressure to think about reading these books, but on the other hand it feels great to be able to help this way, by reading books. I guess we all have to figure out our balance on that ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Hey, Marie!

    First of all, well done for writing such a truthful and honest post. I do sometimes feel dejected when I can’t get ARCs because of them being limited. But I try to brush it off since I do like blogging about books and reviewing them is cool for me, but it does feel good in the end of the day when I realise that I am recognised as a book blogger and I do get ARCs for review.

    But after reading your post, I do feel something like an epiphany. Do I blog for the love of books and the community or for the sake of books?

    After all, I am truly blessed to be a part of this community and I do feel a sense of belonging with fellow bookish nerds.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so, so much, I’m happy you enjoyed this! โค And I love how you talk about recognition, that's exactly how I feel when I can get an ARC…well, they're always e-ARCs, but that's still something I guess ahah ๐Ÿ™‚ But thinking about all this really made me think about how blogging is, before anything, to share love about books between bookish nerds โค

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Why do I always miss your posts?? Thank god for Twitter.

    Anyway! Anyway. I like ARCs and do get both online and physical ones, but I think they come with a bit more obligation than you expect. I know reviews should always be honest and all that, but I feel guilty sometimes giving bad reviews to ARCs that I know cost money for the publishers to send to me… I still do, because I pride myself on being true to my ratings, but that part isn’t so enjoyable sometimes. ๐Ÿ˜›

    I think it’s hard to “police” what people feel about ARCs and “why” they blog. I don’t know anyone who blogs SOLELY for ARCs, but judging from the amount of noise about those things, I suspect they do exist… but my position on this is a bit of a moderate one, I suppose – I don’t think we can tell people why they should blog, and if they want to blog for ARCs… I feel like that’s their call? I don’t advocate it, but I tend to be very hands-off and don’t like telling people what to do. So I guess my whole thought is “I wouldn’t do it myself, but eh, you do you”. ๐Ÿ˜‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ahah oh I’m glad my sharing on Twitter brought you back here then โค
      I'm glad I'm not the only one feeling guilty about it. I guess e-ARCs don't cost as much as physical ARCs to get, but I still feel a little guilty when I didn't enjoy the book. I guess we can't like everything.
      You're right. I guess everyone blogs however they want, and with whatever way they want. I tend to think that blogging only for ARCs is a bit, well…limited, if I can say, because people could miss so many great things about book blogging, if they only do that. There is so much more to this than getting free books, really is what I meant. But yes you're right, anyone blogs however they want after all ๐Ÿ™‚ Thank you so much! โค

      Like

      1. Oh, I agree that it’s limited! It’s also probably not a very… hmm, good idea? Like it takes quite a lot of work to build a following and then send requests to publisher, et cetera, and even then you might not get any ARCs at all. It’s much easier to just buy the books yourself, I think. ๐Ÿ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

  23. As always, fab discussion post! I had no idea ARCs were a thing when I started blogging. I got curious after reading a couple of reviews with mentions of an ARC. There’s a pang of disappointment when I don’t get an ARC but life goes on, and even though sometimes I feel publishers distribute their ARC copies to people who don’t understand it is a privilege and they should use it when they instead waste it, it’s no big deal. I was crushed when I was denied an ARC for The Fire Child, but this publisher has never approved my requests anyway (Damn, it sucks living in France sometimes!) I was greatly surprised to receive a few physical copies from the US and UK to review, and they hold a little special place in my heart because the publishers made the effort to consider a non-native speaker and went to the bother of sending books internationally. I feel the same way you do, the joy of ARCs at first was big, and then I was suddenly buried under the pressure to read and review so many books. My blog is not accepting review requests at the moment, and I haven’t asked for a book on NetGalley for two months. You know what? I feel better! Less pressure, a bigger sense of this brilliant adventure being a hobby rather than a job. It’s all good. Of course, I still have ARCs from my requesting sprees, and I will go back to accepting requests at some point, but now ARCs are less of a big deal, more of a bonus to get once in a while.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Omg how did you get physical ARCs in France? I need tips hahaha. You are so right, I am currently doing the exact same thing. I’m closed to review requests, and I didn’t request a book for a long, long time. I feel overhelmed enough with blogging and reading haha, no reason to add more pressure I guess. It’s so awesome and it feeels so good to receive an ARC, I love it so much when it happens, but you’re right it should stay a bonus, and one we love ๐Ÿ™‚ Thank you my sweechie ! โค

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I only got lucky, reaaaally lucky! I had given up on the idea of receiving physical ARCs! If only international shipping wasn’t so expensive… It’s crazy that we get to have a love/hate relationship with ARCs ๐Ÿ™‚ Have you seen the last drama? Apparently Harper wants to stop physical ARCs and some bloggers have decided to stop blogging because of it… Guys, we’re here for the love of books, not freebies.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Ugh yes, if only! I missed it but I heard a little bit of it afterwards;… It really IS crazy, and I agree with you. I guess everyone has their own reasons for blogging, and ARCs ARE something great, yes, BUT stop blogging because you can’t get any more…That’s crazy, and stupid, well I think these people are missing the point of the blogging community, it’s just sad ๐Ÿ˜ฆ

        Like

  24. Really love this post! ARCs are a huge privilege and they should be remembered to be that way! I don’t expect them to come my way all the time but I am SO absolutely grateful and excited when they do! I really love this post and I agree with everything ๐Ÿ™‚ ARCs really shouldn’t be the reason you start blogging but they’re such a nice thing to have, especially when you CANNOT WAIT FOR a book!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Aww thank you! โค I'm glad you feel the same way. I mean, in a way I can try and understand people loving and wanting ARCs a lot, I do too and it's only human, it's such a privilege and a huge source of fangirling and happiness when it happens ; but we should remind ourselves really that blogging isn't only about this. I heard that some people wanted to quit blogging lately because Harper stopped ARCs for bloggers? not sure of this but I think I heard this and it's a bit crazy. There are so many other great things about blogging we should focus on ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, I think so too! I don’t think anyone should start a blog for the sole purpose of receiving ARCs just because blogging takes dedication and commitment and those ARCs are really like a fun and cool prize along the way! It sounds horrible to have people stop blogging for that sole reason ๐Ÿ˜ฆ I think so too! The feels, the FRIENDSHIPS (I love you my forever crazy!), there are so many more important things!

        Liked by 1 person

  25. I can relate to that jealousy that ARCs can bring, when I saw a blogger from my country with a physical ARC of Holding Up the Universe I was SO jealous. I wanted to have one so badly… but I asked myself if I wanted one why didn’t I sent a request? Well, honestly because ARCs scare me, I’ve seen a lot of people privileged enough to be sent ARCs but I don’t think I’m ready for it yet–both for the pressure and disappointment that it may bring. I’ve only asked eARCs through Netgalley, and yes I’ve been declined more than I’ve been approved and it bugs me why, maybe because I’m not a big blogger or just because of where I live in. Anyways, whenever I get approved my mind keeps on pressuring me that I SHOULD read the book ASAP, and that just makes me want to not read it.

    So basically, we should be thankful for ARCs but like you said, we should not be blogging for them. I never started out my blog to get ARCs, I only had like the smallest idea of what they were back then. I really hope bloggers would not be discouraged to blog if they’re not receiving ARCs, because it really is only as exciting as getting a new book from the bookstore, the only difference is that you’re the first one among your friends to get it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so, so much Louise for sharing your thoughts about this with me ๐Ÿ™‚ I agree, a lot, I sometimes feel so jealous whenever I see people getting ARCs I would LOVE to have just as well, but once again, I do too feel the pressure, whenever I get an ARC, to read and read and JUST READ THAT RIGHT NOW and pressure is real.
      You’re right, we should be grateful before anything else, and it makes me sad when bloggers get discouraged of blogging because they don’t get ARCs. I mean there are SO many great things about blogging, and just, sharing the love for books, and it doesnt have to be all about ARCs ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Excellent post Marie! ๐Ÿ™‚ I decided to pull the plug out of requesting ARC’s 2 months ago or so. It’s just too stressful, and like you’re saying, it becomes work instead of uncomplicated fun. I’ll finish the ones still have piled up right now, and will then happily switch to the million books I bought myself and never get the chance to read :D.

    Physical ARC’s are hardly ever sent my way as well because, hey, Europe, and we’re blogging in English! ๐Ÿ˜‰ I got over that disappointment as well since I wouldn’t know what to do with all of them anyways if publishers decided to send me boxes full of ARC’s like I sometimes see with bloggers from the UK or the US. It would only add fuel to the stressful fire. People who stop blogging because they won’t receive those anymore are just silly and obviously not really loving to blog about books. As for jealousy, I really don’t give a hoot who gets what when they request it. As long as they write a proper review for it, I can only be happy for them! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m glad you’re feeling happy with your decision to stop requesting ARCs ๐Ÿ™‚ I have put my review requests on hold on the blog as well, and I very rarely go on NetGalley anymore to request books. I want to focus on my TBR as well, there are just so many books, and no need to feel too stressed, you’re right, after all all we want is to read and love it, right? ๐Ÿ™‚
      Oh yes, you’re so right, I have no idea what I’d do if I’d get ARC boxes in my mailbox without even asking. I’d feel privileged and honoured, for sure, but wow, all the stress…I’d probably frea out hahaha. Thank you so, so much for your comment, Anne! โค

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Staying away from NetGalley is the best tactic, really. I tried window shopping there, but it just doesn’t work ;). Yes, TBR’s! If I go on at this rate, there will be about 1500 of’em on there next year and…yes, no way! ๐Ÿ˜€ Cleaning out the TBR is mandatory! But not really because that would be too stressful eh ;). Oh, why is this so complicated?! Hahaha, my point exactly! I’d be over the moon and showing it off to everybody, but then the stress of having to read them in time will kick in no doubt. You’re welcome! โค

        Liked by 1 person

  27. This post is so important! As someone who gets a lot of ARCs, I definitely do feel the pressure in constantly needing to review them and not being able to read what I want. If I see someone with an ARC that I want, I’m happy for them because I have so many books to read at home myself! And I know the book will be released eventually anyway. Great post Marie!

    Liked by 1 person

  28. I saw someone post a fab tweet the other day which was something along the lines of: books aren’t bread, they won’t go stale if you don’t read them. The thing is, I have got SO many books since I started blogging this year I decided to really focus on reading those unread books on my shelves. Ok, so I have since bought more books, but I’ve been pretty firm about not requesting ARCs. I’ve still received some and reviewed them throughout the year, but even then I have decided to only invest that time and energy in the ARCs/review copies I REALLY want to read and to also show my bookshelf some love. Great discussion! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh this is a fantastic tweet, and it’s so, so true indeed. I guess with so many great books being released all the time, it’s hard NOT to want to read everything, and to have everything right now, ahah, but this tweet is such a good reminder that books remain alive and ready to be read at all times ๐Ÿ™‚
      Thank you so, so much, Michelle! ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  29. This is an EXCELLENT post. There’s someone (I won’t name names) who constantly asks for the same books I ask for, and when I get denied she gets approved. It drives me nuts. And she tends to rub it in my face (without meaning to hopefully) and it sucks. Just today I was talking about getting denied for two HarperCollins books and she answered with asking me for the titles so she can get them! I was like, ARGH! She wouldn’t even know of the site if I hadn’t told her.
    But then I realized that it shouldn’t bother me. I get good books, and I love reading them. As my blog continues, I will hopefully get approved more, and that will be wonderful. I’m going to stop being jealous and start being happy for her (as much as I can, lol). I’m going to read and review for the pleasure it brings, not just for the free ARCs.
    Though I will say, it’s awesome to get early books! And for free! I have yet to ask for physical ones, but ebooks have been great!
    Thanks for your great and thoughtful post! ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh thank you so, SO much, I’m so happy you enjoyed this so much โค
      Wow, I get it, it must be so annoying, and kind of frustrating, especially when she's running after books you got denied for ๐Ÿ˜ฆ I'd feel so bothered as well, but after all, it's only human to feel this way, isn't it? ๐Ÿ™‚
      I think you're in the right mindset, and we all should start feeling this way: reading for pleasure, and not because of free books, that's why we started blogging and reading after all ๐Ÿ™‚ Thank you!! โค

      Like

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